Robert Anderson Source Page and Photo Gallery
Not only the hero of Ft. Sumter, but also in Kentucky where he recruited the right man.
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Appendices:
- Anderson's Ft. Sumter reports and related correspondance
- Anderson's Kentucky reports and related correspondance

* From Robert Anderson's 18 April 1861 dispatch after boarding the steamship Baltic: "Having defended Fort Sumter for thirty-four hours, until the quarters were entirely burned, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge walls seriously injured, the magazine surrounded by flames, and its door closed from the effects of heat, four barrels and three cartridges of powder only being available, and no provisions remaining but pork, I accepted terms of evacuation offered by General Beauregard, being the same offered by him on the 11th instant, prior to the commencement of hostilities, and marched out of the fort Sunday afternoon, the 14th instant, with colors flying and drums beating, bringing away company and private property, and saluting my flag with fifty guns."

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Robert Anderson defends Ft. Sumpter


..
Robert Anderson was born on 14 June 1805 near Louisville, Kentucky into a slave-holding family steeped in American military tradition. He graduated from from West Point in 1825 (5th out of 37). His brother, Richard, was a lawyer, politician, and diplomat, and Anderson, after graduating from West Point, served briefly as his brother's private secretary when he was minister to Colombia. He was assigned to further instruction at the Fortress Monroe Artillery School, and then taught Artillery at West Point for two years. Among his students were Sherman, Bragg, Beauregard (who became his assistant), McDowell, Meade, Hooker, and Early. His first combat experience came when he commanded Illinois volunteers in the Blackhawk Indian wars. At the battle of Bad Axe on 3 Aug. 1832, he saved the saved an infant Indian from its mother's arms, wounded by the bullet which had killed its mother, and brought it to a dressing station. Three days later he wrote in disgust to his brother that he had observed scenes of "misery axceeding any I ever expected to see in our happy land. Dead bodies, males & females, strewed along the road, left unburied, exposed -- poor, emaciated beings." In 1837 he fought in the Seminole Wars, during which he contracted fevers which recurred for the rest of his life. Because of the illness he could have excused himself from the Mexican War, but he offered to serve anyway, declining an offer to serve on Scott's staff. He was severely wounded at the battle of Molino del Rey, and was afterward breveted for bravery for his role there. Halfway through the war he wrote to his wife, Eba (whom he had married in 1842, Winfield Scott standing in for her father): "I think that no more absurd scheme could be invented for settling national difficulties than the one we are ingaged in -- killing each other to find out who is in the right."

After his service in Florida, Anderson had, with the exception of the interlude in Mexico, worked in administration. In 1839 he translated a French manual on artillery, clarifying the text and adding illustrations. This established Anderson as an authority on the subject. One result was that the American artillery became more efficient, more mobile, thus contributing to the defeat of the Mexicans a few years later. After the Mexican War he became a member of the commision which in 1851 produced  the US army's official textbook for siege artillery.  From 1855 to 1859, in view of his precarious health and probably also due to his connections to Winfield Scott, he was assigned to the light duty of inspecting the iron beams produced in a mill in Trenton, New Jersey for Federal construction projects. He was promoted in 1857 to major in the 1st artillery. In the fall and summer of 1860, Anderson was a member of a commission which, along with his friend Senator Jefferson Davis, examined the curriculum of West Point and its system of discipline. At the time he was 57 and considering retirement, and he would normally have passed into contented obscurity. However, on 15 Nov. 1860 he received an order:

Major Robert Anderson, First Artillery, will forthwith proceed to Fort Moultrie, and immediately relieve Bvt. Col. John Gardner, lieuteant-colonel of First Artillery, in command thereof.

The order, although signed by General Winfield Scott, emanated from the office of the Secretary of War and future Confederate General John B. Floyd who probably chose Anderson in light of his supposed Southern sympathies. Because of his background, and because he had married the daughter of a wealthy Georgia slave holder, but without much other justification, as he was a quiet and reticent man, Anderson was considered pro-southern and a defender of slavery. It is true that he, through his marriage, had become the owner of a small number of slaves, but he sold them all shortly before the beginning of the Civil War. In any case, it was expected that he would be cautious and tactful in his duties, thereby avoiding actions provocative to South Carolina. Southerners as well thought Anderson would be sympathetic to their demands that the forts be turned over to the Confederacy. Indeed, Anderson himself seemed to think that if war could be avoided, the seceding states might, ultimately, return peaceably to the Union. However, apparently nobody had counted on his rigid concept of duty. He liked to say that he lived by his father's religion and General Washington's politics, and that he needed only three documents to guide his path: the Ten Commandments, the Constitution, and the book of army regulations, and he apparently threw in his lot with the Union without hesitation. Through his resolution and patience he made an essential contribution to the Union war effort by getting Beauregard to fire first.

After the unannounced relief ship Star Of the West was fired upon by Carolinian gunners on 9 January 1861, Anderson, not wishing to start a war, withheld his fire. On 26 Dec. 1860 Anderson surprised everyone by suddenly transferring the garrison from the exposed and dilapidated Fort Moultrie to the more defensible, but unfinished Fort Sumter. Decades in the building, it was a large and solid structure of concrete slabs erected on an artificial island overlooking the seaward approaches to Charleston. During this entire period he had had no specific instructions from the administration in Washington. Secretary of War Floyd did send to him Don Carlos Buell, then a captain attached to the War Department, with memorized verbal instructions which Buell, after having seen the condition of Ft. Moultrie, then interpreted in a manner which left Anderson some leeway to decide for himself, whether to transfer or not to Sumter.  Taking advantage of the holiday season and reduced surveillance on the part of the South Carolina milita, Anderson carried out the move during the early evening of 26 Dec. 1860, thus embarrassing President Buchanan and inflaming Southern public opinion. Ft. Sumter was regarded by people on both sides as a symbol. After Lincoln took office, many in his cabinet were willing to relinquish it, but not Lincoln. The Charleston Mercury wrote: "Let us be ready for war...Border Southern States will never join us until we have indicated our power to free ourselves - until we have proven that a garrison of seventy men cannot hold the portal of our commerce. The fate of the Southern Confederacy hangs by the ensign balliards of Fort Sumter."

By April 5, General Beauregard had deprived the fort of its daily supply of food from Charleston and made repeated demands that Anderson surrender, which he refused. On 12 April 1861, just as a relief expedition of several ships was approaching, the Confederates opened fire. The opening bombardment of the Civil War lasted 2 days. On 14 April 1861 Anderson formally surrendered after his food and ammunition had run out.* Thanks to the solid structure of the fort, he suffered not a single casualty during the bombardment, thus demonstrating the wisdom of his decision to abandon Ft. Moultrie. He returned to the North with his garrison and, despite a hero's welcome, felt a sense of failure in not having prevented the war. Anderson was promoted to B.G. USA on 15 May 1861 and took command of the Dept. of Ky. on 28 May 1861. On 15 Aug. 1861 the department was renamed Dept. of the Cumberland. He was at first based in Cincinatti, from where he began recruiting, but transferred to Louisville shortly after the Confederate General Leonidas Polk (without orders) moved into Kentucky and occupied Columbus on the Mississippi. This act violated the precarious neutrality declared by the Kentucky state government, and thus provided Anderson with an excuse to transfer his headquarters to Louisville. He started his assignment with no troops and no equipment, but he had the foresight to insist upon having the services of George H. Thomas and to put him in charge of Fort Dick Robinson, the nation's first modern basic training camp. He worked to get Thomas supplies and to get him promoted. Perhaps weakened by the mental and physical demands of his Sumter service and by the enormous difficulties of his new assignment, he relinquished command on 8 Oct. 1861.  Afterward he went to Washington and supported Thomas as best he could, intervening to keep him from being replaced by a political general. Anderson retired from the army due to disabilities on 27 Oct. 18 63 and was breveted Maj. Gen. USA on 3 Feb. 1865. On 14 April 1865 Anderson was present at Sumter when the original flag was reraised. He later went to Nice, France, seeking a cure for his ailments, and died there on 26 Oct. 1871.


Facts about Robert Anderson (1805-71)
.- hero of more than Ft. Sumter

The most comprehensive treatment I have found of the life of Robert Anderson is in the recent book "Allegiance: Fort Sumter and the Beginning of the Civil War", by David Detzer.

You find below his reports from his Ft. Sumter and Kentucky commands, along with related correspondance.


Major Robert Anderson's Ft. Sumter reports and correspondance

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 1 [S# 1] CHAPTER I. OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S.C.
No. 1. -- Reports of Maj. Robert Anderson, U. S. Army, of the evacuation of Fort Moultrie, S.C.

[ar1_2 con't]
No. 11.]  FORT SUMTER S. C., December 26, 1860--8 p.m.
(Received A. G. O., December 29.)
COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I have just completed, by the blessing of God, the removal to this fort of all of my garrison, except the surgeon, four non-commissioned officers, and seven men. We have one year's supply of hospital stores and about four months' supply of provisions for my command. I left orders to have all the guns at Fort Moultrie spiked, and the carriages of the 32-pounders, which are old, destroyed. I have sent orders to Captain Foster, who remains at Fort Moultrie, to destroy all the ammunition which he cannot send over. The step which I have taken was, in my opinion, necessary to prevent the effusion of blood.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Col. S. COOPER,
Adjutant-General.
<ar1_3>
[Telegram. ]
WAR DEPARTMENT,
Adjutant-General's Office, December 27, 1860.
 Major ANDERSON, Fort Moultrie:
Intelligence has reached here this morning that you have abandoned Fort Moultrie, spiked your guns, burned the carriages, and gone to Fort Sumter. It is not believed, because there is no order for any such movement. Explain the meaning of this report.
 J. B. FLOYD,
Secretary of War.
[ Telegram. ]
CHARLESTON, December 27, 1860.
 Hon. J. B. FLOYD,  Secretary of War:
The telegram is correct. I abandoned Fort Moultrie because I was certain that if attacked my men must have been sacrificed, and the command of the harbor lost. I spiked the guns and destroyed the carriages to keep the guns from being used against us.
If attacked, the garrison would never have surrendered without a fight.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery.
----
No. 12.] FORT SUMTER, S.C., December 27, 1860.
(Received A. G. O., December 31.)
COLONEL: I had the honor to reply this afternoon to the telegram of the honorable Secretary of War in reference to the abandonment of Fort Moultrie. In addition to the reasons given in my telegram and in my letter of last night, I will add as my opinion that many things convinced me that the authorities of the State designed to proceed to a hostile act. Under this impression I could not hesitate that it was my solemn duty to move my command from a fort which we could not probably have held longer than forty-eight or sixty hours, to this one, where my power of resistance is increased to a very great degree. The governor of this State sent down one of his aides to-day and demanded, "courteously, but peremptorily," that I should return my command to Fort Moultrie. I replied that I could not and would not do so. He stated that when the governor came into office he found that there was an understanding between his predecessor and the President that no re-enforcements were to be sent to any of these forts, and particularly to this one, and that I had violated this agreement by having re-enforced this fort. I remarked that I had not re-enforced this command, but that I had merely transferred my garrison from one fort to another, and that, as the commander of this harbor, I had a right to move my men into any fort I deemed proper. I told him that the removal was made on my own responsibility, and that I did it because we were in a position that we could not defend, and also under the firm belief that it was the best means of preventing bloodshed. This afternoon an armed steamer, one of two which have been watching these two forts, between which they have been passing to and fro or anchored for the last ten nights, took possession by escalade of Castle Pinckney. Lieutenant Meade made no resistance. He is with us to-night. They also <ar1_4> took possession to-night of Fort Moultrie, from which I withdrew the remainder of my men this afternoon, leaving the fort in charge of the overseer of the men employed by the Engineer Department. We have left about one month's and a half of provisions in that fort; also some wood and coal and a small quantity of ammunition. We are engaged here to-day in mounting guns and in closing up some of the openings for the embrasures--temporarily closed by light boards, but which would offer but slight resistance to persons seeking entrance. If the workmen return to their work, which I doubt, we shall be enabled in three or four days to have a sufficient number of our guns mounted, and be ready for anything that may occur.
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Col. S. COOPER,
Adjutant-General.

-------------------------------------

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 1 [S# 1] CHAPTER I. OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S.C.
No. 6. -- Reports of Maj. Robert Anderson, First U. S. Artillery, of the bombardment and evacuation of Fort Sumter.

<ar1_12>
STEAMSHIP BALTIC, OFF SANDY HOOK,
April 18, 1861--10.30 a.m.--via New York.
Having defended Fort Sumter for thirty-four hours, until the quarters were entirely burned, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge walls seriously injured, the magazine surrounded by flames, and its door closed from the effects of heat, four barrels and three cartridges of powder only being available, and no provisions remaining but pork, I accepted terms of evacuation offered by General Beauregard, being the same offered by him on the 11th instant, prior to the commencement of hostilities, and marched out of the fort Sunday afternoon, the 14th instant, with colors flying and drums beating, bringing away company and private property, and saluting my flag with fifty guns.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Hon. S. CAMERON,
Secretary of War, Washington.
-----
NEW YORK, April 19, 1861.
COLONEL: I have the honor to send herewith dispatches Nos. 99 and 100,(*)  written at but not mailed in Fort Sumter, and to state that I shall, at as early a date as possible, forward a detailed report of the operations in the harbor of Charleston, S.C., in which my command bore a part on the 12th and 13th instants, ending with the evacuation of Fort Sumter, and the withdrawal, with the honors of war, of my garrison on the 14th instant from that harbor, after having sustained for thirty-four hours the fire from seventeen 10-inch mortars and from batteries of heavy guns, well placed and well served, by the forces under the command of Brigadier-General Beauregard. Fort Sumter is left in ruins from the effect of the shell and shot from his batteries, and officers of his army reported that our firing had destroyed most of the buildings inside Fort Moultrie. God was pleased to guard my little force from the shell and shot which were thrown into and against my work, and to Him are our thanks due that I am enabled to report that no one was seriously injured by their fire. I regret that I have to add that, in consequence of some unaccountable misfortune, one man was killed, two seriously and three slightly wounded whilst saluting our flag as it was lowered.
The officers and men of my command acquitted themselves in a manner which entitles them to the thanks and gratitude of their country, and I feel that I ought not to close this preliminary report without saying that I think it would be injustice to order them on duty of any kind for some months, as both officers and men need rest and the recreation of a garrison life to give them an opportunity to recover from the effects of the hardships of their three months' confinement within the walls of Fort Sumter.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Regiment Artillery, &c.
<ar1_13>
P. S.--I inclose herewith copies of the correspondence between General Beauregard and myself.
 R.A.
 Col. L. THOMAS,
Adjutant-General, Washington, D.C.
-----
[Inclosures.]
1.] HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY, C. S. A.,
Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861.
SIR: The Government of the Confederate States has hitherto forborne from any hostile demonstration against Fort Sumter, in the hope that the Government of the United States, with a view to the amicable adjustment of all questions between the two Governments, and to avert the calamities of war, would voluntarily evacuate it.
There was reason at one time to believe that such would be the course pursued by the Government of the United States, and under that impression my Government has refrained from making any demand for the surrender of the fort. But the Confederate States can no longer delay assuming actual possession of a fortification commanding the entrance of one of their harbors, and necessary to its defense and security.
I am ordered by the Government of the Confederate States to demand the evacuation of Fort Sumter. My aides, Colonel Chesnut and Captain Lee, are authorized to make such demand of you. All proper facilities will be afforded for the removal of yourself and command, together with company arms and property, and all private property, to any post in the United States which you may select. The flag which you have upheld so long and with so much fortitude, under the most trying circumstances, may be saluted by you on taking it down.
Colonel Chesnut and Captain Lee will for a reasonable time, await your answer.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.
 Maj. ROBERT ANDERSON,
Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S.C.
-----
2.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 11, 1861.
GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication demanding the evacuation of this fort, and to say, in reply thereto, that it is a demand with which I regret that my sense of honor, and of my obligations to my Government, prevent my compliance. Thanking you for the fair, manly, and courteous terms proposed, and for the high compliment paid me,
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. BEAUREGARD,
Commanding Provisional Army.
-----
3.] HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY, C. S. A.,
Charleston, S.C., April 11, 1861.
MAJOR: In consequence of the verbal observation made by you to my aides, Messrs. Chesnut and Lee, in relation to the condition of your <ar1_14> supplies, and that you would in a few days be starved out if our guns did not batter you to pieces, or words to that effect, and desiring no useless effusion of blood, I communicated both the verbal observations and your written answer to my communications to my Government.
If you will state the time at which you will evacuate Fort Sumter, and agree that in the mean time you will not use your guns against us unless ours shall be employed against Fort Sumter, we will abstain from opening fire upon you. Colonel Chesnut and Captain Lee are authorized by me to enter into such an agreement with you. You are, therefore, requested to communicate to them an open answer.
I remain, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.
 Maj. ROBERT ANDERSON,
Commanding Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S.C.
-----
4.] Fort SUMTER, S.C., April 12, 1861.
GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by Colonel Chesnut of your second communication of the 11th instant, and to state in reply that, cordially uniting with you in the desire to avoid the useless effusion of blood, I will, if provided with the proper and necessary means of transportation, evacuate Fort Sumter by noon on the 15th instant, and that I will not in the mean time open my fires upon your forces unless compelled to do so by some hostile act against this fort or the flag of my Government by the forces under your command, or by some portion of them, or by the perpetration of some act showing a hostile intention on your part against this fort or the flag it bears, should I not receive prior to that time controlling instructions from my Government or additional supplies.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. BEAUREGARD,
Commanding.
-----
5.] FORT SUMTER, S.C., April 12, 1861--3.20 a.m.
SIR: By authority of Brigadier-General Beauregard, commanding the Provisional Forces of the Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that he will open the fire of his batteries on Fort Sumter in one hour from this time.
We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants,
 JAMES CHESNUT,  JR.,
Aide-de-Camp.
 STEPHEN D. LEE,
Captain, C. S. Army, Aide-de-Camp.
 Maj. ROBERT ANDERSON,
U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Sumter.
-----
6.] FORT SUMTER, S.C., April 13, 1861--20 min. past 2 o'clock.
GENERAL: I thank you for your kindness in having sent your aide to me with an offer of assistance upon your having observed that our flag was down--it being down a few moments, and merely long enough to enable us to replace it on another staff. Your aides will inform you of the circumstance of the visit to my fort by General Wigfall, who said that he came with a message from yourself. <ar1_15>
In the peculiar circumstances in which I am now placed in consequence of that message, and of my reply thereto, I will now state that I am willing to evacuate this fort upon the terms and conditions offered by yourself on the 11th instant, at any hour you may name to-morrow, or as soon as we can arrange means of transportation. I will not replace my flag until the return of your messenger.
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Charleston, S.C.
-----
7.] HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY, C. S. A.,
April 13, 1861--5 min. to 6 o'clock p.m.
SIR: On being informed that you were in distress, caused by a conflagration in Fort Sumter, I immediately dispatched my aides, Colonels Miles and Pryor, and Captain Lee, to offer you any assistance in my power to give.
Learning a few moments afterwards that a white flag was waving on your ramparts, I sent two others of my aides, Colonel Allston and Major Jones, to offer you the following terms of evacuation: All proper facilities for the removal of yourself and command, together with company arms and private property, to any point within the United States you may select.
Apprised that you desire the privilege of saluting your flag on retiring, I cheerfully concede it, in consideration of the gallantry with which you have defended the place under your charge.
The Catawba steamer will be at the landing of Sumter to-morrow morning at any hour you may designate for the purpose of transporting you whither you may desire.
I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding..
 [Maj. R. ANDERSON,
First Artillery, Commanding Fort Sumter, S.C.]
-----
8.] HEADQUARTERS, FORT SUMTER, S. C.,
April 13, 1861--7.50 p.m.
GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this evening, and to express my gratification at its contents. Should it be convenient, I would like to have the Catawba here at about nine o'clock to-morrow morning.
With sentiments of the highest regard and esteem, I am, general,
very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Commanding Provisional Army, C. S.
-----
9.] HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, C. S. A.,
Charleston, April 15, 1861.
The commanding general directs that the commanding officer of the garrison of Fort Sumter will bury the unfortunate soldier who has been accidentally killed by explosion of misplaced powder while saluting <ar1_16> his flag. He will be buried with all the honors of war in the parade of the fort.
By order of Brigadier-General Beauregard:
 W. H. C. WHITING,
Adjutant and Engineer General.
Copy furnished to--
 Major ROBERT ANDERSON,
U. S., First Regiment of Artillery.
-----
P. S.--The wounded will receive the best attention, and will be placed in the State hospital.
By order of General Beauregard:
 W. H. C. WHITING,
Adjutant and Engineer General.
-----
WAR DEPARTMENT,
Washington, April 20, 1861.
 Maj. ROBERT ANDERSON,
Late Commanding at Fort Sumter.
MY DEAR SIR: I am directed by the President of the United States to communicate to you, and through you to the officers and the men under your command, at Forts Moultrie and Sumter, the approbation of the Government of your and their judicious and gallant conduct there, and to tender to you and them the thanks of the Government for the same.
I am, sir, very respectfully,
 SIMON CAMERON,
Secretary of War.


Brig. general Robert Anderson's Kentucky reports and correspondance

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME IV [S# 4] CHAPTER XII. Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In Kentucky And Tennessee From July 1 To November 19, 1861.UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#1

[ar4_251 con't]
ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Washington, D. C., July 1, 1861.
 Lieut. WILLIAM NELSON,  U. S. N., Cincinnati, Ohio:
SIR: Your services having been placed at the disposal of the War Department for the performance of a special duty, the Secretary of War directs me to communicate to you the following instructions:
It being the fixed purpose of the General Government to maintain the Constitution and execute the laws of the Union and to protect all loyal citizens in their constitutional rights, the Secretary directs that you muster into the service of the United States five regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry in East Tennessee, and one regiment of infantry in West Tennessee, to receive pay when called into active service by this Department. You will designate the regimental and company officers, having due respect for the preferences of the regiments <ar4_252> and companies, and send their names to this office for commission. The Ordnance Bureau will forward to Cincinnati, Ohio, 10,000 stands of arms and accouterments, six pieces of field artillery, two smooth and two rifle bore cannon, and two mountain howitzers, and ample supplies of ammunition, to be carried thence through Kentucky into East Tennessee, in such manner as you may direct, for distribution among the men so mustered into service and men organized as Union Home Guards. You will also, at the same time, muster into the service, or designate some suitable person so to do, in Southeast Kentucky, three regiments of infantry, to be commanded and officered in the same manner its herein provided for the Tennessee regiments.
All of the regiments aforesaid will be raised for service in East and West Tennessee and adjacent counties and in East Kentucky. Blank muster rolls and the usual instructions to mustering officers will be sent to you from this office, and in carrying out this order you are authorized to employ such service and use such means as you may deem expedient and proper for its faithful execution. You will likewise report frequently to this office as you progress with your work.
I am, sir, &c.,
 L. THOMAS,
 Adjutant-General.
-----
CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 16, 1861.
 To the ADJUTANT-GENERAL U.S. ARMY:
SIR: For your information I beg to report what has been accomplished towards the Tennessee expedition.
On Sunday, 14th, I met the principal gentlemen of Southeast Kentucky at Lancaster, Ky., and Crab Orchard, and after examining the whole question I appointed Speed S. Fry, of Danville, to be colonel of the First Regiment of Infantry in the expedition; Theophilus T. Garrard, of Clay County, colonel of the Second; Thomas E. Bramlette, of Adair, colonel of the Third, and Frank L. Wolford, of Casey County, to be lieutenant-colonel of the cavalry regiment authorized, reserving the colonelcy for W. J. Landrum, who served in a cavalry regiment during the war with Mexico. Runners were immediately started in all directions, and thirty companies of infantry and five of cavalry will soon be raised---sooner, in fact, than the arms, &c., will reach here for them. To each of the colonels I addressed a letter, a copy of which is inclosed herewith, the place of rendezvous only differing. The transportation of 13,000 stand of arms, with ammunition, accouterments, artillery with its ammunition, &c., also supplies and camp equipage from Cincinnati beyond the Cumberland Gap, a distance of 240 miles, is an undertaking of no little labor. To Nicholasville, Ky.. 110 miles, I shall forward them by railroad; thence to Crab Orchard, 34 miles, is a good turnpike road; thence to the Gap, 96 miles, is a tolerable dirt road.
I have directed the captains of the armed Home Guard at Nicholasville to furnish a sufficient guard for the stores while detained at that place, and also detailed a guard to escort the trains along the road and guard all the bridges to Crab Orchard, where I have ordered five companies to rendezvous immediately to guard the depot at that place, Crab Orchard being at the end of the turnpike. There the wagons must be unloaded and reloaded, for a wagon can haul double on a good pike than on a dirt road. Crab Orchard becomes necessarily the depot of the expedition. The number of wagons to be hired will be large. It is cheaper to hire than to purchase. The articles to be transported <ar4_253> will afford you the best idea of the scale of transportation necessary; 13,000 muskets, weighing 185,000 pounds; ammunition, weighing 54,000 pounds; accouterments, weighing 75,000 pounds; rations, weighing 250,000 pounds; artillery, ammunition therefor, camp equipage, tents, &c. A good wagon can haul on a dirt road about 2,000 pounds. It will require 350 wagon loads to carry this burthen. I have ordered 120 wagons to meet me at Crab Orchard.
The gaps in the mountains are all guarded by rebel troops, but not in sufficient numbers to prevent my going through whichever gap I may select, there being seven. The one that affords the most easy access I will of course choose. I want 100 "broken mules" for packmules, with proper pack-saddles. Without them I will be confined in my movements to roads that are passable for wagons. With them I can move 1,000 men by a bridle-path through the mountains any reasonable distance. They are absolutely necessary to the success of the undertaking, and I shall go on and procure them on four months' time, which is the usual method in Kentucky.
In reference to rations, I have stricken out everything but the substantials, retaining only bacon, pork, flour, coffee, sugar, and vinegar. These I have purchased at sixty days after delivery.
In reference to clothing, I have directed the purchase of 10,000 flannel shirts; 10,000 pairs of socks; 5,000 hats; 5,000 pairs of pants, 5,000 pairs of shoes; all which, as well as the purchases before mentioned, were purchased at the same prices that the quartermaster and commissary pay here, and from the same persons mostly. Also 2,500 pairs of blankets; 5,000 haversacks; 5,000 knapsacks; 5,000 canteens.
I shall forward to-day estimates to the Quartermaster-General and to the Commissary-General of the amounts of articles required in their departments, including besides the foregoing camp equipage only that which is absolutely necessary lot the regiments authorized.
I have to request that Dr. J. J. Mathews, of Louisville, Ky., lately appointed a brigade surgeon, may be ordered to report to me for service in the expedition.
Owing to the absolute necessity of guarding these stores in their transit through Kentucky from destruction by the secessionists, I will muster in the companies now on duty immediately. The main body will be upon active duty from the hour of their arrival at their rendezvous, and I have to request that their pay will commence from that time. The only cash payments I propose making are for the service of the daily transportation.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
 W. NELSON.
-----
CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 30, 1861.
 Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN,
War Department :
From reliable information I learn that about 7,000 or 8,000 Mississippi and Tennessee troops have left Corinth, Union City, Camps Cheatham and Trousdale for Eastern Virginia.
About 2,400 Tennesseeans from Mound City have gone down the Tennessee River to Big Sandy, where they have boats; thence they intend going by Paducah and receive re-enforcements; thence to Caledonia, on Ohio River, above Cairo, and land. A portion are to cross to Illinois Central Railroad track and destroy bridges. The batteries of 32 <ar4_254> and 64 pounders I informed you of, which were at Dover, on the Cumberland River, are to go with this division. They have also eight 6-pounders and four 12.pounders. Troops sickly and discontented. Ammunition rather scarce. All armed with mixed description of muskets and rifles.
I telegraphed you on the 12th to Roaring River, Virginia, of Tennessee and Arkansas troops going by White River to Pocahontas and Pitman's Ferry; to this I have to add that on the 23d, 24th, and 25th instant about 12,000 troops from Union City, Randolph, Memphis, and other points left Randolph by steamer John Walsh and four more boats for New Madrid, Mo., distant from Bloomfield, on the other side of the Great East Swamp, about 30 miles, over which I have just discovered a good plank road.
Bloomfield is distant from Pitman's Ferry 55 miles by good county road. A portion of the troops landed at New Madrid are to march to Bloomfield and join the troops from Pocahontas and Pitman's Ferry, thence proceed to Thebes, Ill., opposite Cape Girardeau. All boats are to be stopped going down the Mississippi at Cape Girardean, while the forces at New Madrid are to stop all boats coming up, and the troops going down the Tennessee River are to stop all the boats on the Ohio, and a simultaneous advance made on Cairo and Bird's Point from Thebes and the Ohio bank, in the rear of Cairo, and the expedition from New Madrid.
The rebels have taken possession of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad for their exclusive use. I know the camp at Cairo and Bird's Point is full of spies, good fellows, and gay ladies, who are bestowing their favors on and spending their money liberally with the general and regimental officers. I do not say they reside in the camp, but they visit it daily, and by some means also at night. The rebels are in possession of accurate drawings of the whole defenses at these points, corrected daily when necessary.
Rosecrans telegraphs me from Clarksburg, Va., that he fears there is something wrong with Cox, as he has not heard from him since the 26th. All was right when my men left Cox. He is reported to have left Charleston---direction of the Gauley---Wise retreating. I advised Cox fully of the dangerous points between Charleston and the Gauley. Will send men there and investigate and report to you and Rosecrans, as he desires.
 E. J. ALLEN.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 57
WAR DEP'T, ADJT. GEN.'S OFFICE,
Washington, August 15, 1861.
I. The States of Kentucky(*) and Tennessee will in future constitute a separate military command, to be known as the Department of the Cumberland, under the command of Brig. Gen. Robert Anderson, U.S. Army.
By order:
 L. THOMAS,
 Adjutant-General.
 <ar4_255>
EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 17, 1861.
 Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:
MY DEAR SIR: Unless there be some reason to the contrary, not known to me, make out a commission for Simon [B.] Buckner, of Kentucky, as a brigadier-general of volunteers. It is to be put into the hands of General Anderson, and delivered to General Buckner or not, at the discretion of General Anderson. Of course it is to remain a secret unless and until the commission is delivered.
Yours, truly,
 A. LINCOLN.
[Indorsement.]
Same day made.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, August 29, 1861.
 THOMAS A. SCOTT:
I earnestly hope that the Government will not lose a moment in preparing for the crisis in Kentucky.
A large force should be concentrated at Evansville, and another at such points that they can be thrown in Louisville in a few hours, that they may be used in interior of Kentucky.
Five thousand are needed for militia in the Indiana border counties. Send any of the altered muskets or whatever can be had. Can you not send some artillery for the defense of our river towns? There is a large number of old-style guns in the arsenal at Pittsburg. The volunteering goes on with unabated vigor. With assurances of good arms we can run our regiments up to forty.
 O. P. MORTON.,
 Governor.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, August 29, 1861.
 THOMAS A. SCOTT:
Civil war in Kentucky is inevitable. The advices from my secret scouts leave no doubt on this subject. A force should be provided, ready to march to the support of Union men at a moment's warning. All the State arms having been put into the hands of the State troops) it is of the first importance to provide arms for the Home Guard in the border counties. Too much importance cannot be attached to this subject.
 O. P. MORTON.
-----
CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 1, 1861.
 Secretary CHASE:
Just arrived. Hardly time to form an intelligent opinion of the state of affairs in Kentucky. Met several gentlemen of Louisville, who seem to think an invasion from Tennessee immediately threatened.
We need everything, arms, accouterments, &c., but with the promises we had in Washington need an abundant supply of money. We will do all that is possible. Will report further from day to day. Please have as many regiments as possible placed, subject to my orders and <ar4_256> within call, in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Do not let General Buell be diverted. I must have him.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, September 2, 1861.
 Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT,  Assistant Secretary of War:
At the risk of being considered troublesome I will say the conspiracy to precipitate Kentucky into revolution is complete. The blow may be struck at any moment, and the southern border is lined with Tennessee troops, ready to march at the instant the Government is ready to meet them. If we lose Kentucky now, God help us.
 O. P. MORTON,
 Governor of Indiana.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, September 2, 1861.
 President LINCOLN:
Kentucky desires that Governor Morton be authorized to send at once to the Ohio River five regiments and two batteries, including Colonel Wallace's regiment. This is also the desire of General Anderson.
We are here representing the views of the Union men of Kentucky to the Governor of Indiana. Governor Morton is apprised of this dispatch and concurs.
 J. T. BOYLE
JOHN J. SPEED,
of Louisville.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,
Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. E. A. PAINE,  Commanding Post, Paducah, Ky.:
I have just received instructions from General Frémont, Saint Louis, that the detachment of Colonel Oglesby's regiment shall remain at Paducah until re-enforcements arrive from Saint Louis, which will be in a few days. You will therefore consider the order from General Grant to return the detachment superseded, and the detachment will remain at your post until further orders. I am expecting Colonel Smith's regiment from Cape Girardeau every hour, and they will immediately proceed to Paducah. General Grant has gone to Jackson to see what forces can be spared there. He will return to-day.
 WM. S. HILLYER,
 Captain and Aide-de-Camp.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,
Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND,  Commanding, &c., Cairo, Ill.:
You will please detail a regiment of infantry and two pieces of light artillery to proceed without delay to Paducah, Ky., to be placed upon their arrival under the command of General E. A. Paine, commanding post. You will also furnish such steamboat transportation as may be necessary.
 WM. S. HILLYER,
 Captain and Aide-de. Camp.
<ar4_257>
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,
Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH,  Commanding Post, Paducah, Ky.:
In accordance with telegraphic instructions received from Major-General Frémont, you will throw up earthworks and plant guns at Paducah, but make no advance. You will occupy Smithland with four companies if they can be spared. Heavy guns will be received here to-morrow and next day, and as many as you will require, not exceeding six, will be sent you. You will please report the number you desire.
By order of Brigadier-General Grant:
 WM. S. HILLYER,
 Captain and Aide-de-Camp.
-----
SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 2
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Cincinnati, Ohio, September 7, 1861.
I. The headquarters of this department are hereby removed from this point to Louisville, Ky.
By order of Brigadier-General Anderson:
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 3
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 10, 1861.
I. Brig. Gen. George H. Thomas, having reported for duty, will repair to Camp Dick Robinson, and will assume command of the brigade organized there. Lieutenant Nelson, U.S. Navy, who has done such good service to the cause of the Union by the zeal and untiring energy he has displayed in providing and distributing arms to the Union men of Kentucky, and in collecting and organizing troops at Camp Dick Robinson, will accept the thanks of the brigadier-general commanding, and who will be pleased to see Lieutenant Nelson and confer with him in reference to further action he may be charged with in this department.
By order of Brigadier-General Anderson:
C. B. THROCKMORTON,
Acting Aide de-Camp.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, IND., September 12, 1861.
 Hon. SIMON CAMERON,  Secretary of War:
The war in Kentucky has commenced. Bowling Green has been seized by the secessionists. Will you not order one regiment to Evansville immediately, to act under the direction of Major-General Love, of Indiana? Can you not send some arms at once? Our border is nearly defenseless. Let me entreat you to give this your attention at once.
 O. P. MORTON,
 Governor of Indiana.
«17 R R---VOL IV» <ar4_258>
FRANKFORT, KY., September 14, 1861.
 General THOMAS:
SIR: A committee from the Union caucus, composed of the members of the legislature, go to Louisville to-night; they return Monday morning. We advise that you do nothing as to the occupation of Mr. Bowlet's road until the committee see and confer freely with General Anderson. It would be well if you could come down and see the committee. We suppose it would be best that both the main roads be simultaneously occupied, unless you should learn something making it necessary to act. Doubtless you and General Anderson are fully posted and may have matured a plan as to these roads; if you have not, you can know General Anderson's plans here on Monday morning.
Respectfully, yours,
 JOHN F. FISK,
 Speaker of the Senate.
 RICH'D A. BUCKNER,
 Speaker of the House.
-----
BERRY, KY., September 14, 1861.
 General THOMAS:
You will here see a plan of operation submitted for your consideration.
First, perhaps a reconnaissance of the principal points should be had by yourself, &c.
The movement on railroad must be a profound secret or the bridges will be burned. Then, say, a simultaneous movement [from] Camp Robinson and Covington, starting so as to be through before daylight. (Trust not the wires.) At the long tunnel, 11 miles south of Covington, leave 100 men; at Grassy Creek, 26 miles south of Covington, leave 300 men; at Falmouth, 39 miles south of Covington, leave 400 men; [at] a small bridge or two near Morgan Station, and up to Boyd's, 14 miles, (Stowers, secesh, part owner of railroad), 100 men; from Boyd's to Cynthiana unsafe---secesh armed companies. At Berry's Station and Boyd's troops would be with friends; and although the bridge [is only] 2 miles from Berry's, I think it would be safer to encamp near that place, as all the land or stations from Berry's to Cynthiana are secesh. Say at Berry's place 500 men, to scout, &c.; at Cynthiana two cannon and 1,000; from Cynthiana to Paris, except Kiser's (I consider unsafe at Kiser's place), 100; at Paris two cannon and 1,200; thence to Lexington (not much danger at Lexington), 80; total, 3,780.
What I mean by unsafe is that a small number of men as marked [sic] could not withstand the secesh force in those localities, and my opinion is that they will fight if they can get the advantage. This all done up in order, and the legislature order out 20,000 troops for sixty days, and [the] rebellion will he flat in Kentucky.
And last and not least, a bill of pains and penalties will be passed by our legislature, and the 20,000 troops will insure the enforcement of draft bill.
Respectfully,
 G. W. BERRY.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 15, 1861.
 His Excellency Governor MORTON,  Indianapolis:
MY DEAR GOVERNOR: I must thank you for the kindness and great courtesy with which you received my friend and colaborer General <ar4_259> Sherman. Events are hastening on which may compel me to take the field before I am ready. Should the necessity arise, and I think the cloud is so threatening that it may be wise for me not to wait any longer, I hope you will give our dear native State all the aid you can.
The movements recently made by Polk and Zollicoffer show that they will make another move as soon as they are ready. The bearer of this note, Captain Prime, is a very discreet, judicious soldier, and will give you my views.
If you can let me have a sufficient number of troops, and I find that I am not too late, I will intimate to you the desire that you shall throw your force forward by simply telegraphing "Yes." It would add greatly to our strength if you could spare a battery of artillery.
I am interrupted and must close.
I have the honor to subscribe myself, with sincere regard and respect,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.
-----
PARIS, KY., September 16, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
DEAR SIR: Not being possessed of the future military plans of the United States Government, I am not prepared to offer you any views that even I myself would consider to be entitled to any reflection.
Nevertheless, believing it to be both the expectation and the purpose of the administration to overcome the military power of the Confederate States and to give effective relief to the Union men of East Tennessee, and also that Kentucky is now an active party to the war, I will on these general assumptions give you a few thoughts.
The most, pressing duty is to give Kentucky all the protection possible; to that end Paducah ought to be held by an adequate United States force, and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad ought to be taken possession of at once by the military authorities as far south as Bowling Green, and a strong force put there and strong works thrown up for its protection.
All the 1orce that can be obtained from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri ought to be put in camp at proper points on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivera, and be diligently drilled and prepared for service. The recruiting of the three years' men in Kentucky should be pressed with the utmost activity and ought to be brought up to 15,000 or 20,000. The legislature should authorize the raising of 40,000 twelve-months' men in Kentucky by volunteering and drafting, to be mustered immediately into the service of the United States.
Men are of no efficiency without arms, and one of the most serious wants for troops to be raised in this State is a proper and sufficient supply of arms. If the arms were at suitable depots, the men could soon be raised. By the time the General Government could be ready to move on East Tennessee from Western Virginia and on Memphis from Missouri, and down the Mississippi, the threes from and through Kentucky would be, ready to move on East Tennessee by the Cumberland Gap, on Middle Tennessee and Nashville from Bowling Green, and towards Memphis from Paducah, and the different columns could continue their march towards the Atlantic coast and occupy North and South Carolina and Georgia, whilst the fleets and other armies were taking possession of all the ports in those States.
The first work to be done for Kentucky is for the United States to  <ar4_260> have at convenient points at the earliest day a full supply of proper arms, and for General Anderson and our legislature to have an immediate and perfect understanding, and then the promptest concurrence of action. Let General Anderson at once and in distinct and precise terms inform Union members of the legislature what he desires that body to do, and, it being thus clearly informed, let it proceed to do it. It is no time for the parties to be procrastinating or palavering when they understand each other. General Anderson ought first and immediately to take military possession of the railroads and telegraphic lines in the State, to be the master of all the communications; that would be a potent signal, that would bring every true Union man in the State to his utmost exertions to give the most execution to such programme as might be agreed upon.
I have given a few views crudely but frankly.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GARRETT DAVIS.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, September 17, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. G. H. THOMAS,  U.S. A.,
Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:
GENERAL: Your letter of the 16th instant has just been received. I will send a supply of buck and ball cartridges (at least 100,000) as soon as they arrive; they have been ordered, and will probably reach here to-morrow. In the present imperfect knowledge which we have of the movements of the rebel forces, I can only direct you to guard strictly the passes on the roads leading from Barboursville to Richmond and Mount Vernon, and intercept and arrest any parties who may be going to join the rebels.
I regret that you have not been able to get staff officers. I am in the same condition, and have so far been unsuccessful in my efforts to obtain the necessary staff.
You had better retain the wagons now hired until you receive those required for from Cincinnati.
General Sherman has been sent to secure Muldraugh's Hill, which was occupied yesterday afternoon by some secessionists.
I hope that the Kentuckians will rally now rapidly and in strength.
Yours, very respectfully,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, IND., September 17, 1861.
 Hon. O. P. MORTON:
A messenger from General Anderson came up this evening, bearing a communication to you, saying a crisis in Kentucky's position will probably occur in the next five days, and asking whether he can depend on you for any assistance. I have informed Captain Prime that we have not any regiments fully organized, and if we had, have no arms to give them. It seems to be a matter of the greatest importance. General Anderson thinks Polk and Zollicoffer will beth soon invade Kentucky. Cannot General Frémont send a few regiments? Two batteries <ar4_261> sent promptly to Kentucky might save the State. Press the matter. I have informed Lieut. Col. T. J. Wood, First Cavalry. Have seen messenger from Anderson and had Colonel Wood informed of the above.
 SCHLATER.
-----
LOUISVILLE, KY., September 18, 1861.
 Hon. S. P. CHASE,
Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D.C.:
SIR: It has become necessary to make an advance into the interior of this State by all the disposable force at my command. Many of the men of Rousseau's brigade and some of the regiments coming in to our assistance are too sick to go forward. Our general hospitals are not yet established; immediate accommodation is required for the sick. Under these circumstances I would respectfully request permission to put the sick of the Army in the U.S. Marine Hospital in this city. The accommodations as far as space are ample, and the medical purveyor of the Army will furnish bedding and bedsteads for the soldiers sent there. An arrangement can be entered into between the War and Treasury Departments in regard to the expenses incurred by keeping these men.
The surveyor of this port has very kindly offered to receive these sick soldiers, but requires your sanction, which I beg you will grant.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-Gcneral, U. S. Army, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 18, 1861.
 Mr. W. M. BRICKEN:
DEAR SIR: The city of Louisville has sent off her Home Guard today to aid in driving the traitors from the position they took last night at Muldraugh's Hill. The people are commencing the same disgraceful course they have pursued elsewhere, burning bridges and destroying property.
Understanding from you that there are several companies of Home Guards in your neighborhood who are very anxious to be allowed to save their State and our country in this hour of our need, I will thank you to say to them that I will be greatly gratified to hear that they have promptly reported themselves to Brigadier-General Sherman. It would be well for them to take blankets and haversacks with them; also as much ammunition as they can take.
I omitted to state that while in the service they will receive the same pay as the volunteers.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 18, 1861.
 SAMUEL GILL,  Esq.:
I will thank you to issue order at once and send runners to the different counties recommending the Home Guards, with their arms, to rendezvous  <ar4_262> at Camp Dick Robinson, Lexington, and other points which you may deem advisable. In this way we can secure them for my force for defense, and prevent the taking of the arms from the scattered Home Guards.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.
-----
LEXINGTON, September 18, 1861.
 General THOMAS,  Camp Robinson:
DEAR SIR: You will see from the inclosed dispatch that your request for cannon has been granted,and that it is deemed proper to have them go another route in place of coming to this place by rail. The Home Guards of this place have all been notified to be on hand to-night, ready to protect the cannon, if they have been shipped this way, as first intended. This will be handed you by Mr. Milward, one of our best men, unless he should meet with your messenger at Nicholasville. See that Warner attends to the dispatch inclosed from Bowler.
Yours, respectfully,
 JOHN C. COCHRAN.
 JOHN B. WILGERS.
[lnclosure. ]
FRANKFORT, September 18, 1861.
 To Capt. SANDERS D. BRUCE:
General Thomas can get six pieces of cannon, 6 pounders, and ammunition and horses. He must send a mounted force by Nicholasville and Versailles or by Danville and Harrodsburg. Send this to Camp Robinson forthwith. This is better than railroad.
 JAS. HARLAN.
-----
FRANKFORT, KY., September 18, 1861.
 General THOMAS:
SIR: From indications that point to a gathering of the rebels in Lexington on Saturday next from the surrounding country, we deem it of vital importance that you move a regiment there forthwith, fully prepared for a fight.
The State Guards from all this part of the State meet in Lexington on Saturday ostensibly for drill. They have been buying and stealing all the powder and lead they can get, even tearing up lead pipes. We will take measures to have a large force of Home Guards to meet you. You take the Fair Grounds for a camp, unless you can do better. No time is to be lost. They have taken Muldraugh's Hill, we are informed, 1,500 strong, and burned the bridge over Rolling Fork of Salt River.
General Rousseau is after them, with from 2,000 to 3,000 men; but the loss of the bridge is a great misfortune. If they take Lexington with 2,500 men, as we fear they will, they will take the arsenal and magazine here, and disperse or capture the legislature.
Please let there be no delay.
Respectfully, yours,
 JOHN F. FISK,
 Speaker of the Senate.
 RICH'D A. BUCKNER,
 Speaker of the House.
<ar4_263>
[Indorsement.]
DEAR GENERAL: I doubt not that the secessionists contemplate taking Lexington and seizing the banks. It is of vital importance that you send a regiment to Lexington by Friday evening. I have harness sufficient for the guns and limber, but not for the caissons. I am preparing some ammunition. Send with your regiment some extra ammunition for the Home Guards. I will let you have six guns, 6-pounders, and caissons, if you desire them. Send your force for these guns directly to this place by way of Nicholasville and Versailles.
Yours, truly,
 SAM. GILL.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 19, 1861.
 Lieutenant-Colonel OLIVER,
Comdg. Independent Rifle Battalion, Cincinnati, Ohio:
COLONEL: You would place the State of Kentucky and our Union under great obligations to yourself and your command if you could come down to our assistance. General Sherman is in advance, and needs all the force we can raise. Kentucky has no armed men whose services I can command. If you come, bring all the camp equipage and ammunition you can get. Whilst in the service, you shall have the same pay as given by law.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.
-----
NICHOLASVILLE, September 19, 1861--11.30 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
I have just sent forward some of my men to Lexington. Will have trains in two hours, and by 3 o'clock a.m. will be at Lexington with my regiment. I have not seen or heard of the cavalry, but will order it forward when it arrives. We are in advance of all expectation, and will take them by surprise. I met the inclosed dispatch at this place from General Anderson. We will do what men may do; rely on us for that. I deem it better to go forward to-night, as it will avoid the tricks of the secessionists on the road.
In haste, respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
[Inclosure.]
LOUISVILLE, September 19, 1861.
 To S. D. BRUCE,  for Brigadier-General THOMAS,
Camp Robinson:
You are authorized to send a regiment to the camp at Lexington, Ky.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 80
WAR DEPARTMENT, A. G. O.,
Washington, September 19, 1861.
I. The Military Department of the Ohio will in future consist of the State of that name, Indiana, and so much of Kentucky as lies within 15 <ar4_264> miles of Cincinnati, under the command of Brigadier-General Mitchel, of the U.S. Volunteers; headquarters, Cincinnati.
By order:
 L. THOMAS,
 Adjutant-General.
-----
CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 20, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Commanding Camp Robinson, Ky.:
DEAR SIR: I commenced the shipment of wagons to you, and before I had gotten fairly under way I had orders from Western Virginia for 400. The consequence is, you are left without for the present. I will cheerfully do anything I can for you at any time, but these same difficulties will be constantly occurring. General Rosecrans' orders must of course take precedence.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JNO. H. DICKERSON,
 Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 21, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS,  Adjutant-General, Washington, D.C.:
GENERAL: I am instructed by General Anderson to report to you that there are now in the field at Rolling Fork Bridge, on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, nearly 2,500 men, 1,800 of whom are very reliable troops, of Colonel Rousseau's command. The remainder are Home Guards, and are of but little value, lacking very much in discipline, organization, and equipment. The Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, Col. W. H. Gibson, arrived here to-day from Cincinnati, and will shortly proceed to Rolling Fork Bridge. A detachment of 200 Fifteenth Infantry recruits, under command of Capt. P. T. Swaine, Fifteenth Infantry, have also arrived, and will to-day proceed to join forces already at the bridge. Two regiments are telegraphed as ready to leave Indianapolis for here as soon as transportation can be secured. Two regiments were telegraphed as ready to come from there also, if they could be supplied with arms. They were telegraphed to come and arms would be furnished. Other regiments are expected and detachments of men are being collected all over the State of Kentucky, so that in a day or two we shall outnumber the rebels, and in the mean time the general thinks he in sufficiently strong to prevent any further advance on their part. The general instructs me to again request that you will order Captain Gilbert's company to his department from Saint Louis. He considers it almost absolutely indispensable that he should have a company of regular infantry here---at present at least. He has now no means of enforcing his order in the city.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 21, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
Your letter of instructions was handed me a few minutes since by Mr. Ware. I understand that there are now 600 Home Guards watching <ar4_265> the railroad. It occurs to me that they can sufficiently guard the road, and in case of emergency I am near enough to reenforce them. You are aware that we have no tents with us, and I learn from Major Buford, who knows the localities, that there is no place where our men can be quartered with sufficient shelter near the bridge. To quarter at the depot would separate the main body too far from the guard for efficient support. Many of the men are without blankets, and all without coats or blouses, and the weather is such that to occupy the open air and sleep on the ground without shelter or blankets would be dangerous to the men, especially as they have measles in the camp. We have five new cases here.
Our quarters are comfortable here, and the men seem well pleased with the place. There is considerable stir amongst the secessionists; they are alarmed. I think their meeting here will not take place; they are fixing to run, rather than fight. Rumors through the night last night were constant of movements on foot, and it is thought they ran off the 140 rifles last night to flee to the Southern Army.
I have this moment learned, through Mr. Crittenden, of Missouri, now at this place, from what he deems reliable authority, that the arms are at Leonidas Johnston's, in Scott County; that the secesh of Harrison and other points collect there this evening to make a run to the Southern Army to-night through Anderson County. The Home Guards of Mercer ought to be on the lookout, and a strict watch kept along the line from Lebanon to Louisville. I will, if the news be confirmed, in the course of the day telegraph to Louisville to General Anderson.
I have sent for Captain Bruce and Dr. Dudley, to consult about moving to Cynthiana. My own opinion is that this is the point for a few days at least. We are doing good by being here, and it is the finest place for drilling the men I have seen. Plenty of the best water at hand.
I wish you could take time to come and inspect the position, and determine whether it would not be well to keep an encampment here for instruction, as well as for security of the roads.
In haste, respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE,
 Colonel, Commanding at Camp Robert Anderson.
-----
WASHINGTON, September 22, 1861.
 Major-General FRÉMONT:
Governor Morton telegraphs as follows: Colonel Lane, just arrived by special train, represents Owensborough, 40 miles above Evansville, in possession of secessionists. Green River is navigable. Owensborough must be seized. We want a gunboat sent up from Paducah for that purpose. Send up the gunboat if, in your discretion, you think it right. Perhaps you had better order those in charge of the Ohio River to guard it vigilantly at all points.
 A. LINCOLN.
-----
HEADQUARTERS WFSTERN DEPARTMENT,
Saint Louis, September 22, 1861.
 A. LINCOLN,  President, Washington:
Your dispatch received. I have immediately ordered Captain Foote with gunboat to dislodge the rebels from Owensborough, and will take measures to guard the Ohio. <ar4_266>
Have placed my two Illinois regiments at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, at the disposal of General Anderson, and so informed him by telegraph.
 J. C. FREMONT,
 Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,
Cairo, Ill., September 22, 1861.
 Capt. A. H. FOOTE,
Commanding Naval Forces Western Waters, Cairo, Ill.:
In pursuance of telegraphic instructions received from headquarters Western Department, you will proceed with the gunboat Lexington from here and Conestoga from Paducah to Owensborough, Ky., where the Confederates are said to have taken possession, and dislodge them. General Frémont's instructions are that the Ohio River is to be kept open.
 U.S. GRANT,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
INDIANAPOLIS, September 22, 1861.
 Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:
I much regret that subsequent events have prevented me from sending you the troops. Reliable advices on Friday show an advance on Louisville by a force of not less than 10,000 men, and Anderson had not more than 3,000. Anderson begged for troops. Our own safety required that they should be furnished. We have sent him four regiments, and one to Evansville. We are out of arms. Can you not lend us 5,000 for the time? Louisville is considered in great danger this morning, and many doubt whether it can be saved. Please send us arms by special train.
 O. P. MORTON,
 Governor of Indiana.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 22, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,
Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:
GENERAL: Your two notes of September 20(*) have been received. Messrs. Hoskins and Howard have been authorized to procure tents. We have none here, and no proper material for making them.
The danger in which Louisville is at this time renders it impossible for me to comply with your request that I would send you four well-drilled regiments and a battery of artillery. The latter has already been forwarded; the former cannot be obtained from any source.
A rally has been ordered of the militia and Home Guards, and I trust that you will have a force of true men, who, battling for their firesides and their homes, will soon drive the bandits from our soil.
God save our country!
Respectfully and sincerely, yours,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.
<ar4_267>
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON,
September 22, 1861---5 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
I inclose letter just handed to me by Judge Buckner.((*)) He informs me that steps are taken to have forces fall in here and at Camp Robin-son-Home Guards, &c., to act under your command---and that I am expected to protect the place, and, if you think right, move forward to secure the railroad, part of which is now in possession of General Mitchel, with 2,000 forces.
I can't hear from my family at Columbia. If any letters or news comes from there to me, do me the great kindness to forward it. I rest uneasy for news from my wife and little children at that place, now held, as I learn, by traitor troops.
Respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON,
September 22, 1861---11.30 p.m.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I have just sent out two companies to watch the various passes, and seize guns, which my scouts think will be attempted to be moved to-night by the rebels. While engaged in instructing the commandants of the different squads I received the inclosed letter, which I forward to you, as I have no cavalry with which to operate at the distance from here required. Lawrenceburg is about 25 miles from Camp Robinson, and there is no doubt in my mind but it is in the direct line of the rebel movements. I have it from so many reliable sources, that I am well assured that their line of communication and for stealing purposes lies through Versailles, Lawrenceburg, and Spencer County.
Some point which could be secured, and which Morgan Vance, of Harrodsburg, could designate, ought to be secured by 200 or 300 cavalry, so as to intercept arms, &c., and seize any armed traitors who may attempt to move in that direction.
We are getting along pretty well here, and I think our presence here has greatly alarmed and disconcerted them in their movements.
Breckinridge and others fled the night we reached here and in advance of our arrival, having been warned by a scamp by the name of Smith, from Nicholasville.  They are not far, I learn to-day, from Mount Sterling, at a little place called Hazel Green, and it is thought are concentrating forces in that vicinity. I send this by the same gentleman who brought the letter inclosed. Captain Hoskins' indorsement of them is sufficient.
In haste, respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
[Inclosure.]
VERSAILLES, KY., September 22, 1861.
 Colonel BRAMLETTE,  Commanding at Camp Anderson:
DEAR SIR: We believe, from reliable information, that many of the secessionists from the surrounding country are collecting in Anderson County, for the purpose of joining our enemies in Tennessee or the southern part of this State. They are constantly moving in that direction <ar4_268> by way of Lawrenceburg. I was informed to-day that they had taken possession of the State arms in that county for the purpose of taking them with them to the Southern Confederacy. I state these facts for the purpose of suggesting the propriety of sending a sufficient force on that line to intercept them. I send this by my friends H. C. McLeod, &c., and recommend them to your confidence.
Yours, truly,
 J. E. HOSKINS,
 Captain, Woodford Home Guards.
-----
FRANKFORT, KY., September 22, 1861.
 Hon. R. BUCKNER:
Please send speakers [regiment], as desired by Mr. Gill. The track this side of Falmouth is torn up for 2 or 3 miles. Humphrey Marshall is assembling a force at Drennan Springs. Don't let General Thomas send too much force against Zollicoffer, but let him open the Covington and Lexington Railroad promptly. Our munitions must come that way. The mountaineers will whip Zollicoffer as soon as they get ammunition.
By all means send them lead, lead, lead!
Respectfully, yours,
 JOHN F. FISK.
-----
HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE,
Camp Dick Robinson, September 22, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. ROBERT ANDERSON,  U.S. A.,
Commanding Department of the Cumberland:
GENERAL: Mr. Corcoran arrived here last evening. I am constantly beset with importunities from citizens near the border to advance to their relief; and to do so with these troops in their present disorganized state will lead to certain disaster, and in that event we shall have to fall back upon the Ohio, and lose all the advantages we now have by holding this place. I cannot think of it for a moment, unless I could have 4,000 well-drilled men and a battery of artillery.
My latest advices from Barboursville are to this effect, that the enemy are concentrating in East Tennessee, both from Virginia and the far South. This looks like an invasion of Kentucky in force, and we should be prepared to meet them; but my hands are completely tied, unless the Government will give me an organized force to work with.
It is absolutely necessary that an engineer, a quartermaster, and the four regiments of infantry, and a battery of artillery above referred to, all equipped for the field upon reaching here, should be sent to me without a moment's delay.
I am assured by the most reliable people from East Tennessee that an invasion of Kentucky from that quarter is intended, and I beg that the Government will place me in a condition to defend this part of the State.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
<ar4_269>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
.Louisville, Ky., September 23, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,
Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:
GENERAL: By the direction of the general I write to say that for the present he can afford you no assistance as you required. Louisville is very strongly threatened, and until that point is out of danger he can send no re-enforcements to you.
He considers your views of the emergency as eminently just and proper, and nothing would afford him greater pleasure than to aid you with all the re-enforcements you ask if it was possible. Until he can send them (which he hopes will be very soon), he trusts you will be able to hold your position.
The general directs me to say that he gives his cordial approval to your course in occupying the asylum at Harrodsburg with the Home Guards.
You are fully authorized to contract for the subsistence of the men, in any detachment you may send out, in the manner you think most desirable. You are also authorized to contract for clothing and tents, in amount equal to your necessities, at any point where they can be obtained.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant.General.
-----
ESTILL SPRINGS, September 23, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,
Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Camp Robinson:
DEAR SIR: Yours of the 23d instant, directing me to hold my main body at Irvine, &c., is received. We encamped here yesterday with two full companies raised in this county, and we are looking for another from Owsley County this evening; also one from Jackson County. Other companies are forming in this and other counties I learn. I have several companies in Camp Robinson who propose to join my regiment. Will it be inconsistent or incompatible for me to ask you to permit them to be sent here I I hope not. We need blankets, tents, and other camp equipage, and guns, and I know we ought to have them right away.
Great activity in the counties around on the part of the secessionists. Our people are recruiting rapidly. I have house room at my place (Estill Springs), adjacent to Irvine, to lodge several companies and officers, but we can't do without blankets. Straw is the best we can do, and the use of it makes it dangerous on account of fire, &c.
Samuel Gill, of military board, ordered or directed me to use my houses for quarters for men and officers until further orders, stating that he had had full conversations with General Anderson, and that it met his entire approbation; but for this, and other information from reliable sources, I would have sent my men forward to your camp. A camp at my place will greatly facilitate enlistments for the Government and hold the secessionists in check.
Can't we have some cavalry for scouts sent us I They are greatly needed, and will be more so very soon. Quick work. Blankets, tents, guns, &c., will help us and give our people confidence. More depends <ar4_270> on this than men ordinarily imagine. The mountain people are peculiar, and I know them.
Hoping that these hasty views will be regarded in the proper light, and made in the utmost good faith and respect, I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
 SIDNEY M. BARNES.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 23, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I send this evening, under escort of the Jessamine Home Guards, three caissons to Nicholasville.
Upon the 11 o'clock train to-morrow I will forward to Nicholasville, under escort of one company, 82 boxes musket cartridges, 20 boxes minie cartridges, and 50 kegs rifle powder. Should anything else come this evening I will forward it.
I have no further news or rumors. I can but think that the movements of the secessionists are from fright and not for battle, yet many very prudent and wise men differ with me, who think we shall be assailed here soon---this week. Such is the opinion of Dr. R. J. Breckenridge, with whom I have held counsel. Your superior military judgment must determine what course to pursue. I can move in one hour, if required, but am of opinion that this post ought to be held as a rallying point for Home Guards and place for organizing other troops, besides giving protection to such goods as may be shipped to Camp Robinson.
Respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 23, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I have just learned from a reliable man, who gets it through rebel relations now engaged in the movement, that the activity of the secessionists is to embody a larger force than we have, they think 3,000, and attack this camp this week. There is an unusual stir in all the adjacent counties, either for preparation or from fright. If we had a few experienced artillerists and some grape and shrapnel &c., I will hold the place while a man lives to fight; but I need some cavalry for pickets and scouts. The inertness of the Union men, their sensationalism, their utter backwardness in rushing to the call of our country is annoying.
This would be a good point for your headquarters, the communications being rapid, the means of transportation being better than your present position.
To fall back from this place now would give encouragement to the traitors; they have scampered, but would soon return if we leave; they doubtless would return with force enough, in such event, to roll the banks, for they need money. I think it probable, if they can embody sufficient force to give them confidence, they may make the attempt; but I doubt their ability to do so. It will do no harm, however, to be ready for the emergency, whatever may come.
If I had sufficient cavalry to scout the country for some distance around some valuable discoveries might perhaps be made as to the movements of the traitors. As I wrote you last night, Breckinridge and <ar4_271> others fled to the mountains the night of my arrival here in advance of arrival, having been warned by a rebel by the name of -----,who posted forward upon our arrival at Nicholasville. Should you deem it advisable to move more forces forward, it would be well to precede the movement by sending forward to have him watched and arrested if he makes any movement. If there is any necessity or probable necessity for your forces remaining at Camp Robinson, I will, if you so direct, undertake to hold this position so long as you may require it.
We have so many sensational rumors that I give but little reliance to any, except so far as to be on my guard. I have just learned, since I commenced writing, that some kid-gloved gentry, who pretend to be Union men---Buckner, Johnson, and others---last night, in caucus, are disposed to censure me for suffering guns to be run off the night after my arrival here. I hope it is not true that they do so, for it would be an act of sneaking cowardice in them, which I should be sorry to have to brand them with. I was not advised of any such movement, left the matter to Dudley and Bruce, and told them I would back them when they required it with all my force. They became satisfied that nothing was (lone, and that the arms were still concealed in the city. We have been using all activity to ascertain, and last night arranged upon what was deemed good authority to intercept them; now rumor says they were run off on Friday night. If these men make any censure upon me for not accomplishing what they had not the spirit to do for themselves, or even to notify me to do, they will lose in the game.
Just handed me the inclosed dispatch, which I hasten to you and close. You will perceive that something is Up.
Respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
P. S.---I have employed a messenger to bear this, deeming it necessary that you get the dispatch forthwith.
[lnclosure.]
FRANKFORT, KY., September 23, 1861.
 Maj. E. L. DUDLEY:
Dispatch from New Castle, stating that Humphrey Marshall, at head of 1,000 cavalry, in Owen; supposed to be moving on to Frankfort. Hold yourself in readiness to come with as many men as you can.
I will apprise you again.
 J. M. MILLS.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON,
September 23, 1861--7.30 p.m.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I inclose you telegraph from Frankfort. I have moved with one battalion, leaving Colonel Scott in command here. We should be re-enforced here forthwith.
Respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
[Inclosure.]
FRANKFORT, KY., September 23, 1861.
 Col. THO. E. BRAMLETTE:
Come on with your men. All arrangements for your accommodation made.
 H. J. TODD.
<ar4_272>
MOUNT VERNON,
Monday Morning, September 23, 1861.
 General THOMAS,  U.S. A., Commanding Camp Robinson:
GENERAL: I have been detained here a short time to have horses shod, but shall leave in a few minutes for Rockcastle Hills, and then cross over to the London and Richmond road. I hope to employ men to-day to obstruct the London and Winding Blades roads.
I learn by a person who left London last night that the rebels had 400 cavalry at Laurel Bridge, a point 6 miles south of former place I hope to stay on the Big Hill to-night, unless we should be cut off' by the enemy's pickets.
Will it not be well to dispatch a force without delay to occupy Big Hill, letting them march across the country from Lancaster and enter the Richmond road at Morris, 13 miles south of Richmond? I shall return by that way; meet and give them such information as I may gather. I hope the force for Rockcastle Hills will be hurried up.
If you desire it, 600 to 800 Home Guards may be gathered on Rock-castle Hills at twenty-four hours' notice; at least, so I am advised here.
In haste, respectfully, your obedient servant,
 S. P. CARTER,
 Lieutenant, U.S. Navy (on special duty).
-----
EIGHT MILES FROM LONDON,
Monday Evening, September 23, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,  U.S. A., &c.:
GENERAL: I have examined the roads thus far, and find that almost the entire way from Big Rockcastle River to this point can be defended against a superior force. I have selected for the present a point 1¼ miles south of the River as the best position, all things considered, although but for the scarcity of water there may be other points which an experienced military man would prefer.
I have learned this afternoon that the rebels have evacuated Barboursville and returned to Cumberland Ford. They have not been near London. There seems to be no danger of an advance by them.
I shall now retrace my steps, and go over the Winding Blades road to the London and Richmond road.
In haste, respectfully, your obedient servant,
 S. P. CARTER.
-----
FRANKFORT, KY., September 23, 1861.
 Colonel BRAMLETTE:
The capital is thought to be in danger. Send down to-night 300 men immediately after the train gets in; they will stop in the depot. Bring rations. Bring no cannon.
 JOHN F. FISK,
 Speaker of Senate.
-----
 SEPTEMBER 24, 1861.
 [General THOMAS?]:
DEAR GENERAL: Colonel Bramlette left here last night for Frankfort, and, as you will see from the inclosed dispatch, he apprehends more <ar4_273> danger here than at that point. You had better send us 100 or 200 cavalry until Colonel Bramlette returns. The secessionists were very busy running around this vicinity last night with guns. We succeeded in taking fire guns. If you cannot send us the cavalry, we think you had better send us 400 or 500 men from Garrard's or Fry's regiments. If you conclude to send the infantry, they can be here to-night by 9 o'clock. We consider this of vital importance or we would not ask it.
Your obedient servants,
 W. T. SCOTT,
 Lieutenant-Colonel.
 S. D. BRUCE. S. H. CHIRMO,
Captain.
P. S.---We have but 340 or 350 men in camp, including Home Guards. If you cannot re-enforce us, send a special messenger, so that we can have Colonel Bramlette with us.
Respectfully,
 W. T. SCOTT.
P. S.---We have reliable information that two secession cavalry companies left here last night--that is, from this county and Clark; they are gone in the direction of Cumberland Gap; they are not well armed, and if intercepted could be easily taken.
 W. T. SCOTT,
 First Kentucky Volunteers.
[Inclosure.]
FRANKFORT, September 24, 1861.
 Col. W. T. SCOTT:
I send by express some grape and canister. I believe you are in as much danger at Lexington as here. General Thomas, I hope, will send you re-enforcements. If he does not, telegraph to me, and I must return. Give me anything that occurs. Be watchful---vigilant.
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 24, 1861.
In obedience to instructions from the War Department the undersigned assumes command of the Department of the Cumberland, composed of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee.(*)
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.
-----
OWENSBOROUGH, September 25, 1861.
 Major-general FRÉMONT,
Commanding Western Army, Saint Louis:
GENERAL: Agreeably to your orders, per telegram of the 22d inst., and farther instructions from General Grant, commanding at Cairo, to proceed to Owensborough with the gunboats for the purpose of keeping «18 R R---VOL IV»  <ar4_274> the Ohio River open and to dislodge the rebels supposed to have been in possession of that place, I proceeded to Paducah, on the morning of the 23d, in the steamer Bee, before the gunboat Lexington, Commander Stembel, was ready to leave Cairo, for the purpose of calling on General Smith, and having the gunboat Conestoga, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, ready, on the arrival of the Lexington, to accompany me up the river. On arriving at Paducah, I ascertained from General Smith that the Conestoga had gone on a short cruise. Consequently, on the arrival of the Lexington, I immediately proceeded with her alone up the river, taking with us the steamer Bee, as the water was low and the river falling, that we might have the means, if grounding, of getting afloat more readily. I also sent the Bee up the Cumberland River 15 miles, in a vain search for the Conestoga. After grounding twice, at I o'clock on the morning of the 24th instant we were compelled to anchor and lie over till 8 a.m., when, in company with the Bee and she towing us, we proceeded up the river to Evansville, from whence I telegraphed you at 11 p.m. This morning (25th)we reached Owensborough; found no batteries, but were boarded by Colonel McHenry, who, with Colonel Hawkins, had each a skeleton Kentucky regiment, which had arrived the morning previous. I sent for the authorities of the place and directed them to prevent the display of secession flags. A strong disunion sentiment is manifest in the place, but no disrespect was offered me, although I have been much among the people, but I directed Commander Stembel to hold as little communication with the shore as practicable. The colonels, with their force, as previously designed, left the town during the day, although I strongly importuned them to remain, as I did the Cincinnati company, but they declined on the ground of not being properly equipped nor having been mustered into the service. Under these circumstances, and the water requiring the Lexington soon to leave, I went down to Evansville, in the steamer Bee, and telegraphed to Governor Morton, at Vincennes, Ind., asking for 500 men for Owensborough. If I get no reply, I purpose telegraphing General Anderson at Louisville for the same number. On returning to Owensborough in the evening I again communicated with the shore; after which, and giving my orders to Commander Stembel to remain till the low water required him to leave in order to reach Cairo safely, I ran down to Evansville, meeting and boarding the Conestoga en route, and giving her instructions, and here have telegraphed to General Anderson for 500 men to be sent to Owensborough.
Having done all in my power in this quarter, and the preparations of the gunboats in Saint Louis demanding my immediate attention, I leave for that place at 10 a.m. to-morrow, and trust that I may personally communicate with you in the evening.
In haste, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 A. H. FOOTE,
 Captain.
-----
CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 25, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I went to Frankfort. The enemy came not. I am now back and ready for action.
The measles is still amongst my troops; there are 70 just recovering and just taking measles now on the sick list.
H. Marshall took fright and moved his forces, about 500, from near the Franklin line, in Owen, to Caney Creek, near the Scott line; they <ar4_275> are evidently trying to run. If I had sufficient cavalry I could surround and cut them off. I think, however, they will stampede for Hazel Green, where Breckinridge is forming an encampment in the extreme edge of Morgan, adjoining Wolfe County. They no doubt intend to pass down through Breathitt, Perry, and Clay, to Knox, and join the invaders at Cumberland Ford. I shall try and get some reliable scouts, and, if I can find their position in striking distance, shall move upon them. If you have any use for me, however, my longer stay here is, I think, unnecessary, as I can effect but little or nothing with infantry against the flying rebels.
This is a good place to instruct; is convenient to move, and being at the end of the telegraph, news readily passed. I await your orders.
Respectfully,
 THO. E. BRAMLETTE.
-----
SAINT LOUIS, September 26, 1861.
 Brigadier-General SMITH,  Camp at Paducah:
SIR: The rebels having occupied Owensborough, you are directed to send to that place the regiment ordered to Evansville on the 25th instant, together with two gunboats. After dispersing the enemy the force will return again to Paducah, as the latest movements of the enemy require the concentration of our troops as far as possible at that place.
 J. C. FREMONT,
 Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
[Cincinnati,] September 26, 1861.
 E. D. TOWNSEND,  Assistant Adjutant-General:
SIR: Your telegram of the 25th instant is received. Only two regiments of Illinois troops have been in Camp Dennison. Both of these have been sent to General Anderson at Louisville by order of General Fremont.
I reached these headquarters on Saturday evening, the 22d instant, and found the city greatly excited. General Anderson was reported to be in great peril, and Louisville threatened with attack by a large force under Buckner, approaching by Muldraugh's Hill, near the point of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, where the railroad crosses the Salt River; also by turnpike road leading to the mouth of Salt River and thence to Louisville. It was further stated that Zollicoffer had already entered Kentucky by the way of Cumberland Gap, laying waste the country, and marching on Lexington and Frankfort, while Breckinridge was assembling in force in Morgan County and Humphrey Marshall in Owen County, Kentucky.
I telegraphed the legislature of Kentucky, asking to be placed by them in a position to act within 15 miles of this city. A reply came promptly, with full authority, and an earnest appeal to send 5,000 troops to their aid, and to drive back Zollicoffer; also requests came for assistance to General Anderson through his brother, Larz Anderson, esq., of this city.
General Buckingham came to this city at my request, arriving Sunday  <ar4_276> morning, bringing Colonel Whittlesey, a military engineer. We examined the Kentucky Hill, opposite the city, and decided on a plan of defense. The engineers are at work. General Buckingham and myself then reviewed carefully the condition of all the fragments of regiments in this State, and I ordered into Camp Dennison all regiments more than half full. We then prepared the necessary papers and instructions to inaugurate greater alacrity in recruiting volunteers.
Monday morning General Morris arrived from Governor Morton, of Indiana, with the most earnest appeal for arms from Ohio. After consultation, Governor Dennison and Governor Morton were called to the city by telegraph to concert measures, and General Anderson was desired to come or send a confidential representative. The meeting was held Monday afternoon and evening, and resulted in this State furnishing Indiana 3,000 muskets for the emergency, and a determination to urge forward troops to possess and hold the strong points in Kentucky.
I have already a regiment in possession of the hither extremity of the Covington and Lexington Railroad. To-day a regiment proceeds to Cynthiana and Paris to hold the entire road, and will be followed by another this evening to hold the Lexington and Louisville Railroad. These will be followed by a force sufficient to render it possible (when combined with the troops under General Thomas at Camp Dick Robins, 130 miles from this) to commence active and immediate operations to drive Zollicoffer and Breckinridge out of the State or to capture them.
Holding as I hope the entire region based on the Ohio from Portsmouth, Ohio, to Louisville, Ky., with the two railways already mentioned, with secure lines of communication by rail with Cincinnati and Louisville and by turnpike with Maysville and Portsmouth, a powerful force may be moved from the region near Lexington and Frankfort, and may operate either towards the Cumberland Gap, or, after shutting up that pass, concentrate a powerful column and drive the enemy back from Muldraugh's Hill, secure Louisville, and threaten Nashville.
Such are my present ideas. I have no knowledge of the views of General Anderson further than he begs me to aid Lexington and Frankfort and General Thomas.
I have thus presented in as few words as possible the position in which I am placed and the general outline of defense lot my Department of Ohio and Indiana.
I have directed the staff officers to send forward to General Rosecrans supplies of all kinds without consulting me, up to the point where it becomes a doubt whether if more be sent it will not endanger the safety of this department; then to stop and be governed by my orders. In like manner I am ready to send troops to Virginia or to Washington so long as in my judgment I retain a force sufficient to insure the protection of Ohio and Indiana. In adopting this course I am, as I conceive, acting strictly up to my orders.
I deem the immediate occupancy of Kentucky as a matter of the greatest importance and the fall of Louisville as a disaster the consequences of which cannot be overestimated. I therefore urge the necessity.of placing in supreme command of this expedition to Kentucky and to Tennessee an experienced general, who will command the entire confidence of the Government.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General, Comdg. Dep't of the Ohio.
<ar4_277>
COLUMBUS, OHIO, September 26, 1861.
 Hon. SIMON CAMERON,  Secretary of War:
The urgent call for troops in Kentucky compels me to send six or eight regiments before their organization is entirely completed. They have the men and arms and are ready for service, but owing to the want of mustering officers many of the muster rolls are unfinished, and the field and staff and many of the company officers have not been mustered in, and under your order No. 66 cannot take command and draw pay. This will create great embarrassment, unless you authorize me to give in all such cases effective commission of proper date.
 W. DENNISON,
 Governor of Ohio.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 26, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,  Commanding at Elizabethtown:
GENERAL: The general directs me to say that, as the ten days of the Home Guard will expire on Saturday evening, he suggests the importance of arranging for your rear guard.
He thinks that Colonel Crittenden's portion of a regiment would probably be the most available for that purpose, but he leaves it with you to decide.
The postmaster here informs me that there is a large amount of mail matter in the office here for your command. He says if you will send in some properly authorized person the mails will be turned over to him, put up in packages for the different regiments. The general suggests the appointment of some competent person to come in here as often as you may deem desirable.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
MAYSVILLE, KY., September 26, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Camp Dick Robinson, Bryantsville:
DEAR SIR: I inclose herewith a copy of the instructions under which I purchased the mules. I thought that I had sent it to you before.
These mules were to be purchased because of the political effect it would have, and these instructions were issued at my instance.
I think that I wrote you that Morgan Vance, of Harrodsburg, would indicate the persons from whom the balance of the mules were to be taken.
Very truly,
 W. NELSON.
[Inclosure.]
WAR DEPARTMENT, August 29, 1861.
 Lieut. W. NELSON,  U.S. N.,
Camp Dick Robinson, near Bryantsville, Ky.:
SIR: Understanding that you may need 600 mules of the largest class for purpose of transportation, you are authorized by the Department to purchase them at a price not to exceed $125 each, to average fifteen hands high. <ar4_278>
If you deem it to the interest of your command not to have these mules delivered immediately, you can arrange to have them transferred to your possession any time within the next two months, not to be paid for until delivered.
This Department desires that purchases shall, as far as possible, be made in the country where the troops are raised, in the hope that it will have a beneficial effect upon the Union sentiments of the people.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 SIMON CAMERON,
 Secretary of War.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 27, 1861.
 J. J. ANDERSON,  Esq.:
SIR: Your letter asking for information with regard to the meaning of General Anderson's proclamation(*) is received.
In reply I am authorized by the general to say that no one will be arrested for mere opinion's sake. All peaceable citizens, of whatever opinion, will be protected if they do not engage in giving aid in any manner to the enemies of our country.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS, MULDRAUGH'S HILL, KENTUCKY,
September 27, 1861.
 Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE,  Asst. Adjt. Gen., Louisville, Ky. :
SIR: When I left Louisville in the cars, in charge of the Home Guard, followed by Rousseau's brigade, I understood my orders to be to station parties along the road to guard the bridges, secure the road, and to occupy the Muldraugh's Hill. On reaching the Rolling Fork of Salt River we found it a deep stream, with railroad bridge burned down and still burning. This, of course, stopped our progress, and we disembarked the men. Various rumors of the force of the enemy which had done this wanton mischief and stolen various cars and locomotives reached me, but estimating the force not to exceed 200, I sent forward a strong picket of 400 men, under Colonel Rousseau, and afterwards strengthened it by another 400, but receiving a telegraphic order from you in the 21st, I recalled Rousseau. Finding the effect of this to be very bad, and that great importance was attached to Muldraugh's Hill, and having notice of re-enforcements, I concluded we should reoccupy the hill; and accordingly, on Sunday morning, the 22d instant, I put in motion Rousseau's brigade, and followed up with the Thirty-eighth Indiana, Colonel Scribner, and the Forty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Gibson, and a detachment of regulars, under Captain Swaine. We ascended Clear Creek Valley, near the railroad, to the top of Muldraugh's Hill. We examined the ground near the tunnel, and then proceeded to Elizabethtown, and encamped near the town. The next day we moved on the Lebanon road to this camp, where we have been ever since.
Since our arrival the command has been re-enforced by the Thirty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Harrison. On our way up I left Colonel Crittenden's regiment to guard the road to Colesburg, but have since called him forward, and he is now posted beyond Elizabethtown, the guarding <ar4_279> of the road being intrusted to Colonel Hughes' [Hecker's?] Illinois Regiment.
This is not an isolated hill, but a range separating the waters of the Rolling Fork of Salt Creek and Green River, the ascent from the north being very abrupt and the descent to the south being very gradual. Our position is far from being a strong one when held against a superior force. Roads will enable an enemy with cavalry to pass around us and cut off our communications and starve us out. We have no safe line of retreat, and must stand our ground let what will happen. Our opponents, led by General Buckner, who is familiar with the ground, are now supposed to be along the railroad from Green River to Bowling Green. Their forces are variously estimated from 7,000 to 20,000 men, and I doubt not they have 15,000, some well and some poorly armed, but all actuated by a common purpose to destroy us.
I am fully alive to the danger of our position and to all its disadvantages, especially that of supplies. Our provisions have been hauled up the rugged valley of Clear Creek by hired wagons and by some which were brought along by the Thirty-ninth Indiana. We can barely supply our wants, and are liable at any moment to have those wagons seized. The reason I came to Muldraugh's Hill was for effect. Had it fallen into the hands of our enemies, the cause would have been lost, and even with it in our possession a week nobody has rallied to our support. I expected, as we had reason to, that the people of Kentucky would rally to our support, but, on the contrary, none have joined us; while hundreds, we are told, are going to Bowling Green. The railroad from Bowling Green towards us is broken at Nolin, 10 miles off, and at another trestle beyond some 7 miles. I doubt if this was done by Buckner's orders, but rather by the small parties of guards left to protect them, and who were scared at our approach. I have from time to time given you telegraphic notice of these events, and must now await the development. We should have here at least 20,000 men; but that has been an impossibility.
Truly, yours,
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,
Paducah, Ky., September 28, 1861.
 ASSISTANT ADJUTANT GENERAL,
Headquarters Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:
Intimations from various quarters are that this place is to be attacked soon by a heavy force from Columbus. We need more artillery, say 24-pounder howitzers, with plenty of ammunition for the same.
 C. F. SMITH,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,
Paducah, Ky., September 28, 1861.
 ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,
Headquarters Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:
General Frémont's letter of September 26 just received. The gunboat Lexington has just returned from Owensborough, and reports no enemy there. The gunboat Conestoga is now at Owensborough.
 C. F. SMITH,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
<ar4_280>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., September 28, 1861.
 General O. M. MITCHEL,
Commanding U. S. Forces, Cincinnati, Ohio:
DEAR SIR: I have had as full a conversation with General McCook in reference to the condition and wants of my department as the press of business has permitted.
I need, as the general will tell you, all the regiments you can spare. I shall not attempt to guard neighborhoods, but will form not more than three corps d'armées. Forward the regiments, as rapidly as you can get them ready, to this point. Here is where the most urgent call is for additional force, and the sooner here the better. It would give me great pleasure to correspond with you, but I am without assistance, and have not time to make the proper reports and communications to the War Department. You will aid me greatly if you will order General McCook down to assist me in my department.
In haste, yours, very respectfully,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, September 28, 1861-5 p.m.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
Colonel Wolford has sent me a special messenger to notify you the rebels are within 8 miles or less of London. They suppose there are from 5,000 to 7,000; does not say whether they have artillery or not.
I am in camp one-half mile this side of the intrenchments, and will do our best to maintain our position. It is unnecessary for me to make any suggestions as to more men, as you will understand all.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD.
P. S.---I will not seal this. I will authorize the messenger to show it tel the commander of any troops he may meet. It is 13 miles from here to London.
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel, Third Regiment Volunteers.
-----
CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 28, 1861.
 Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,  Assistant Adjutant-General:
On the 26th instant, at the request of General Anderson and the Kentucky legislature, my own judgment concurring, I ordered Colonel Van Derveer, commanding Thirty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, to take and hold the Central Kentucky Railroad from Covington to Lexington. This has been successfully accomplished, the bridges all guarded, and our communications with Camp Dick Robinson are now secure. On the 27th instant Colonel Steedman, commanding Fourteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, left Covington under orders to occupy a point on the Lexington and Louisville Railroad near Locks 2 and 3, Kentucky River. We thus surround a force supposed to be concentrated in Owen County, Ky., commanded by Humphrey Marshall, while we secure our communication between Camp Dick Robinson and Louisville.
A Union company is forming at Maysville, Ky., giving us a cordon <ar4_281> of troops extending from Maysville, by Lexington and Frankfort, to Louisville. I have taken possession of the Kentucky Central Railroad in the name of the Government.
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, September 29, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Camp Dick Robinson:
Colonel Wolford came into camp bringing with him the Home Guard under Colonel Brown.
The enemy have taken London. The colonel says they are in large force, and have about 600 cavalry. We might defend this place, and could if they were to come the road, but they can go through the woods with infantry. They could go the Richmond road until they cross Rock-castle River several miles, then there is a good road that intersects this road 1½ miles this side of Mount Vernon.
Should they take that road, we would be then completely cut off from your camp, there being no road for us to travel with wagons, and none that infantry could travel, except through the woods. It is 8 miles from this to the Richmond road, and it runs nearly parallel for some 15 or 20 miles, several miles beyond Mount Vernon.
Owing to the present circumstances, Colonel Wolford will remain with us.
The Home Guards that have been run off will have to be supplied with provisions from our stores, there being no provisions in the neighborhood. Corn is scarce; no old corn except that that is brought some 10 or 12 miles.
I will await your answer, unless I am perfectly satisfied we should retreat.
Hawkins, Burton, Walker, and five others are with the rebels, they having been conveyed through the woods or by-ways. They passed the Home Guards under the pretense that they were from Camp Robinson and sent there as spies to report to you. I have no doubt Burton, &c., were sent by their friends to carry the rebels into Madison County, knowing they were defenseless.
From what I have written you can see through the scheme (provided I am not mistaken). The last heard of the pickets they were this side of London, about half way between London and the forks of the Richmond road.
I consulted with Colonel Wolford before writing this. One of Colonel Wolford's men fired on another of his men, wounding the man, and killing one horse and wounding another. The private that shot himself at camp, which I informed you of, died yesterday, so the bearer of your dispatch informed me.
There is but little water here, not sufficient for horses and men without hauling, which we could do.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment.
-----
LOUISVILLE, September 30, 1861.
 To PRESIDENT UNITED STATES,  Washington, D.C.:
The following telegram just received from General Thomas: "The enemy is at London, about 50 miles from here, and approaching this <ar4_282> way in force. Send re-enforcements immediately." With Buckner in our front, I cannot withdraw any troops from Sherman. Shall send a regiment which arrived last night, also Steedman's from Eminence---all that I think can now be spared. I will telegraph to the governors of Indiana and Ohio. I hope you will send off all the troops from the North you can raise. Arrangements in the proper departments must be made for securing supplies for the forces which will be thus suddenly collected in this State.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
LOUISVILLE, Ky., September 30, 1861.
 General THOMAS,  Lexington:
I have ordered two regiments to re-enforce you, and sent telegrams to the President and to the governors of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois to forward re-enforcements as rapidly as possible. Do your best.
I hope that it will turn out that the enemy's force has been magnified.
 ROBERT ANDERSON.
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, September 30, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Camp Dick Robinson:
My wife sent a messenger to me that has just arrived. The rebels have taken Manchester, pulled down the flag, tore it up, and placed theirs on the same pole. The messenger says they turned back from Manchester, taking from one of the furnaces fifty wagon loads of salt.
I have nothing of importance to write you since Colonel Wolford left. I would like very much to have Colonel Wolford with us or some more experienced person. Lieutenant Dillion is quite young, though he appears to be very active.
The Home Guard are still coming in. Colonel Brown is trying to make arrangements to feed them with beef and flour. Captain Adams has written you, I suppose, on the subject of supplies.
I have no definite news that the enemy is this side of the forks of the road, though the messenger from my house says he heard guns firing this morning in the direction of the forks of the road.
Many of our men have never drawn blankets, and some who have joined since we left have no clothing. Captain McDaniel, of Colonel Barnes' regiment, has some 12 or 15 recruits that joined him on the road that have no clothing. If you have a supply of clothing I would like for you to have furnished sufficient for the recruits. None of the regiment have received coats, and the nights are quite cool. We had frost last night.
There are many persons here who cannot purchase food. They are willing to fight if they are fed, as they say they cannot go home. They are also willing to work or do anything else required.
If you could see proper, I would like to see you in regard to our fortifications. I am not pleased with them; they are very good, provided the enemy would march up to them, but infantry could flank us on either side. It is quite difficult to do so, but infantry can go anywhere a common hunter can. If it will not be convenient for you to visit the camp (and I cannot see how you can leave), I would like for some experienced person to come immediately.
When I reached [here] the work had been commenced 2 miles or more <ar4_283> from the river. We have been still cutting timber in all the points or hollows that we think will be of service. I will return there if not instructed to the contrary---to the point near the meeting-house.
I would like to hear from you at your earliest convenience.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
-----
EVANSVILLE, September 30, 1861.
 General PAINE:
General Buckner was at Greenville at 3 o'clock yesterday---destination, Lock and Dam No. 1, on Green River---with 5,200 men. Information strictly reliable. Send 3,000 troops with gunboat; 400 forthwith. We have 400 men there.
 JOHN G. HOLLOWAY.
[Indorsement.]
Can't be furnished. I don't know Mr. Holloway.
 C. F. SMITH,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
CINCINNATI, September 30, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Lexington, Commanding:
General Mitchel has ordered Seventeenth Ohio and one more regiment on to-night. Four more regiments will follow to-morrow, accompanied by two batteries.
I will report myself to you to-morrow at 10 a.m.
 G. C. KNIFFIN.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
September 30, 1861.
 General THOMAS,  Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:
In answer to your request, just received, I have ordered the following commanding officers to report to you for duty: Colonel Steedman today; Colonel Walker leaves to-night at 9; Colonel Connell leaves to-morrow at 2.30 p.m.; Colonel Bradley at 7 a.m. October 2; Colonel Dickey at 12 o'clock October 2; Colonel Norton at 6 a.m. October 3. Two batteries of 6-pounders will accompany these troops, and I hope to forward a third very soon.
I will take the field in person in case I find it possible to leave my headquarters here.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
September 30, 1861.
 Colonel LANDRAM,
Or the Officer in command of Home Guards on Big Hill:
SIR: The enemy is reported to me as occupying London in force. I therefore wish, and direct, you to obstruct the Richmond road by cutting  <ar4_284> trees across it and filling it up with rock from the cliffs, commencing on the London side of the Rockcastle River, and extending as far back as the Natural Bridge, on the Big Hill, and station your men at the most advantageous position and defend the road. Also send men and have the road from the Richmond to the Mount Vernon road obstructed so that troops cannot march along it.
Do anything in your power to keep the enemy from crossing Rock-castle River.
Respectfully, &c.,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
September 30, 1861.
 Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN,
Commanding Department of the Potomac:
GENERAL: I have just had a conversation with Mr. W. B. Carter, of Tennessee, on the subject of the destruction of the Grand Trunk Railroad through that State. He assures me that he can have it done if the Government will intrust him with a small sum of money to give confidence to the persons to be employed to do it. It would be one of the most important services that could be done for the country, and I most earnestly hope you will use your influence with the authorities in furtherance of his plans, which he will submit to you, together with the reasons for doing the work.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U.S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
October 1, 1861,
 Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE,
Assistant Adjutant-General, U.S. Army,
Headquarters Department of Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:
CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that General Mitchel has ordered the Seventeenth Ohio Regiment to report to me immediately, and will send four more, with two batteries of artillery, as rapidly as they can come. This force will be sufficient for the defense of this position at present, and I have respectfully to ask that hereafter troops may be assembled at Camp Dennison and held in readiness to move whenever I may call for them. An encampment at Lexington also would be very convenient, as the troops could easily get supplies at that point, and I could call upon them from here to move either by this road or by the road through Richmond, according to circumstances.
I have at last found a gentleman who seems to comprehend the duties of the quartermaster's department, and I am in hopes we may be able to get along with less confusion than heretofore.
The enemy is still held beyond the Rockcastle Hills, and I am in hopes in two days more we shall have those hills sufficiently fortified to prevent any further advance.
Colonel Hoskins was permitted by me to go to Pulaski County to see about the organization of his regiment. On the 29th ultimo, soon after <ar4_285> his arrival in that county, hearing of an invasion of Albany by the rebels, he assembled together a party, consisting of some of his recruits, the Home Guards of the adjoining counties, and a company of Colonel Wolford's cavalry, which I had sent down, pursued the enemy to Travisville, surprised their camp, and dispersed them, killing 4 and making some captures of horses and other property. I will send a copy of his report by next mail.(*)
If the general approves of my plan (submitted a few days since) of forming encampments at Somerset, Burkesville, Columbia, and Greensburg, I think that part of Kentucky will soon be relieved.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
October 1, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL,
Commanding Department of the Ohio:
GENERAL: Your communication of the 30th ultimo was received this afternoon, and I take this occasion to express my thanks for the promptness with which you have responded to my call. Our means of transportation is now so limited, that I will respectfully suggest that all the wagons that can be sent with these regiments be forwarded, to facilitate any forward movement which I may find it in my power to make.
If you could send a column of about four regiments up the Big Sandy and move it south through the counties of Floyd, Letcher, and Harlan, in co-operation with my advance by Barboursville, I believe that we might easily seize the railroad and cut off all communication between Virginia and the South through Tennessee before the enemy will have time to re-enforce Zollicoffer sufficiently to prevent it.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
 OCTOBER 1, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  U.S. A.,
Commanding Camp Robinson, &c. :
GENERAL: I sent your letter to Colonel Landram from Mount Vernon this morning, and wrote him a note requesting him to take possession of the Big Rockcastle Ford and a hill on the south side of the river bank, as well as to close the road [at] the fords. I also requested him to employ men to destroy the McKee road without delay.
From all I can learn, the rebels have retreated some distance south of London. I presume they have fallen back only temporarily.
I fear that the Home Guards will not do much towards defending Big Hill, from the sample they gave near London. Organized troops are needed there.
The impression seems to be that the rebels will take the Madison road or go by McKee's.
I find the cavalry are returning to Camp Robinson, but if I can get enough at Camp Wildcat I shall send them to the Big Hill.
Excuse this; I write on horseback.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 S. P. CARTER.
 <ar4_286>
CAMP WILDCAT, October 1, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Camp Dick Robinson:
I have information, reliable, that the rebels retreated 9 miles beyond London on Sunday. A negro of mine reached camp last night with a letter from my wife; she says they left there Sunday morning and returned towards their encampment on Cumberland River. Rumor says they have destroyed much property in Knox.
They destroyed Captain Murphy's property. He is in the Third Regiment of Volunteers from Clay County. They tore down haystacks and burnt some rails for another person, is all the damage they done except taking the coffee and salt, for which I learn they left Jeff. Davis bonds.
Colonel Wolford and myself mule arrangements to blockade the Madison road to-day, but we, on consultation last night, agreed to countermand the order this morning; though, should you desire it, please say so, and we will have it attended to immediately.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
P. S.---I would like very much for General Crittenden to send some one here to take command of his forces; they are organizing three companies; though I suppose Colonel Brown will do so. I will endeavor to get Colonel Brown to move them on the river, 2 miles from us; they are in our camp, and it is almost impossible to do anything with them or our men.
 T. T. GARRARD.
-----
CAMP AT ALBANY,
October 1, 1861---8 a.m.
 Brigadier-General THOMAS:
SIR: I find it impossible to hold the Home Guards of Casey and Lincoln longer than forty-eight hours from this time.
I learn that the Confederate troops are rallying again at Travisville, with the intention of attacking us. From the best information, they cannot muster a force exceeding 1,150. Last night at 9 o'clock our picket guard were fired upon by a party of seven persons within 3 miles of the camp; they returned the fire, with what effect I have not ascertained. None of ours were injured that I know of, though one of the picket has not yet come up.
I have ordered a detachment of fifty cavalry to scout the whole country in the neighborhood of the beat at which the pickets were stationed, as also that in which the absent picket was stationed.
We are occupying what I consider a strong natural position and one of importance to the cause, rendered so by many circumstances, among which are the following, viz:
Within the camp guard we have three good flouring mills; within the county we have an abundance of wheat and forage, and, it being situated south of the Cumberland River, could they get possession of the county it would serve as a rallying point to which they could gather re-enforcements by way of the Cumberland River, while the number of roads diverging from this point would enable them to move forward in the direction of either Monticello, Jamestown, or Burkesville. Between this and the Cumberland River there are five beds of stone-coal, an article of importance to them. Below, at Burkesville, there are five salt wells, the possession of which is all-important to the rebels. <ar4_287>
I hope to be sufficiently re-enforced by night to proceed with the work of blockading.
While I cannot expect to hold for any length of time the Home Guards from the counties of Casey and Lincoln, yet it is due them to mention the heroic conduct of Colonel Barnes, as also the men under his command. When the alarm was given by the driving in of the pickets, at the command they came to position like veteran soldiers, and promptly obeyed every order.
If it is desired, under the circumstances, that our position should be held, I will await your orders. If we should be compelled to abandon it, had I not best order the destruction of the mills at this place, as they would be all-important to the permanent occupancy of the place by the Confederate troops?
If it should be ordered to hold the position, please send forward Lieutenant-Colonel Howard, with all the forces under his command, and other forces, numbering, in all, say, 800 men.
Major Brents is here, by order of Colonel Wolford, and has proven himself a most active and efficient officer, and one whose services I shall need at least until the camp can be properly organized. He desires to know whether it will meet your approbation for him to remain for that time.
I shall also ask the aid of Captain Morrison, with his command, as they are familiar with the country, and the number of roads leading into this place requires a strong picket force.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 W. A. HOSKINS,
 Commanding -Post.
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, October 1, 1861.
 General THOMAS:
DEAR SIR: The enemy, in full retreat, are by this time in Barboursville. I am starting my men by squads to Camp Dick Robinson, and will be there myself day after to-morrow, or as quick thereafter as I can, unless I receive different orders from you.
 FRANK WOLFORD.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17
HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,
Paducah, Ky., October 1, 1861.
The following proclamation of the governor of Kentucky, and resolutions and enactments passed by the legislature of the same at its present session, are commended to the careful consideration of the people of the western part of the State, viz:
PROCLAMATION.
In obedience to the subjoined resolution, adopted by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the Government of the Confederate States, the State of Tennessee, and all others concerned, are hereby informed that "Kentucky expects the Confederate or Tennessee troops to be withdrawn from her soil unconditionally."
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my name and caused the seal of the Commonwealth to be affixed. Done at Frankfort, this the 13th day of September, A. D. 1861, and in the seventieth year of the Commonwealth.
[L. S.]
B. MAGOFFIN.
By the Governor:
THOS. B. MONROE,
 Jr., Secretary of State.
 <ar4_288>
"Resolved by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That his excellency Governor Magoffin be, and he is hereby, instructed to inform those concerned that Kentucky expects the Confederate or Tennessee troops to be withdrawn from her soil unconditionally."
RESOLUTIONS.
Wheras Kentucky has been invaded by the forces of the so-called Confederate States, and the commanders of the forces so invading the State have insolently prescribed the conditions upon which they will withdraw, thus insulting the dignity of the State by demanding terms to which Kentucky cannot listen without dishonor: Therefore,
Resolved, That the invaders must be expelled.
Inasmuch as there are now in Kentucky Federal troops assembled for the purpose of preserving the tranquillity of the State and of defending and protecting the people of Kentucky in the peaceful enjoyment, of their lives and property: It is
Resolved, That General Robert Anderson, a native Kentuckian, who has been appointed to the command of the Department of Cumberland, be requested to take instant command, with authority and power from this Commonwealth to call out a volunteer force in Kentucky for the purpose of repelling the invaders from our soil.
Resolved, That, in using the means which duty and honor require shall be used to expel the invaders from the soil of Kentucky, no citizen shall be molested on account of his political opinions; that no citizen's property shall be taken or confiscated because of such opinions, nor shall any slave be set free by any military commander; and that all peaceable citizens who remain at home and attend to their private business, until legally called into the public service, as well as their families, are entitled to and shall receive the fullest protection of the government in the enjoyment of their lives, their liberties, and their property.
Resolved, That his excellency the governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky be requested to give all the aid in his power to accomplish the end desired by these resolutions, and that he issue his proclamation calling out the militia of the State, and that he place the same under the command of General Thomas L. Crittenden.
Resolved, That the patriotism of every Kentuckian is invoked and is confidently relied upon to give active aid in the defense of the Commonwealth.
ENACTMENT.
1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That as the soil of the State of Kentucky has been invaded by armed forces acting under the authority of the so-called Confederate States, therefore, for the purpose of repelling said invasion, the governor of the State of Kentucky is hereby directed to issue his proclamation, calling out not less than forty thousand soldiers, residents and citizens of Kentucky, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, to be mustered into the service of this Commonwealth for any term of service not Jess than twelve months nor more than three years from the time they were mustered into service, unless sooner discharged.
2. That the governor be, and he is hereby, authorized, in order to raise said force, to accept of the services of any volunteer companies who shall within three months from the date of his proclamation tender their services; and he shall commission for that purpose all officers duly elected by the companies aforesaid, necessary and proper for the command of such volunteers.
3. That all volunteer officers, non-comissioned officers, musicians, and privates, whose service may be tendered and accepted under the provisions of this act, shall be mustered into service at such places of rendezvous in the Congressional district in which they shall volunteer as the general in the field shall appoint by his order; and when so mustered into service, shall be then and there entitled to receive in advance one month's pay, to be taken and considered as part of their pay.
4. That the forces to be raised and organized, as provided for by this act, shall, when mustered into service, be under the command of the general commanding the State forces in the field.
5. That the governor be also authorized to accept the services of fifteen hundred men, in addition to the forty thousand men provided for by this act, one thousand to be used as sharpshooters and scouts, and five hundred to be used as horsemen and scouts, they furnishing their own horses: Provided, That no person shall be accepted in this arm of the service unless his skill and capacity have been tested by the general in command or such officer as he may detail for that purpose: And provided also, That such person shall receive five dollars per month of extra pay.
6. That each horseman for the service of his horse shall receive five dollars per month; and in case his horse is killed by the enemy, he shall be paid the value of the horse, not exceeding one hundred and fifty dollars.
7. That the commander in the field may organize individuals who tender themselves into companies, and such companies as may tender themselves into squadrons, battalions, <ar4_289> and regiments, and permit them to elect their officers, who shall, when so, elected, be commissioned by the governor on the certificate of the general commanding.
8. That the governor is authorized to accept the services of squadrons, battalions, and regiments, when tendered as such, and commission the officers elected by the squadrons, battalions, and regiments so organized; the election of officers by any company battalion, squadron, or regiment shall be superintended and conducted by any justice of the peace or judge of the county court who may be called on for that purpose, and such justice or judge shall certify to the military board the names of the officers elected and for what office each is elected, and thereupon said board, if they approve the proceeding, shall certify to the governor the names of the officers elected, and what office they have been respectively elected to fill, who shall issue commissions in conformity to such certificate.
9. That the commanding general shall be entitled to appoint and employ such staff officers, and with such rank, as the inspector-general is empowered to appoint by the fourteenth section of the third article of the act entitled "An act for the better organization of the Kentucky militia," approved March 5, 1860; and he shall have the authority conferred on said inspector general by the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth sections of said article of said act.
10. The troops raised under this act shall be organized into squadrons, battalions, regiments, brigades, and divisions, and have the same number of officers for each squadron, battalion, regiment, brigade, and division as are allowed in the Army of the United States, and shall receive the same pay and rations as are allowed the troops of the United States of the same rank and grade. When brigades and divisions are formed out of t he troops so raised, they shall be officered according to existing laws.
The brigadier-general commanding calls the attention of the loyal inhabitants in this part of the State to the address of Judge R. K. Williams, of this date, who is authorized to raise a regiment of volunteers for the service of the United States.
By order of Brig. Gen. C. F. Smith:
 THOS. J. NEWSHAM,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
----
CAMP WILDCAT, October 2, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,  U.S. A.,
Commanding Camp Robinson, &v.:
My note of yesterday advised you that I had dispatched your letter to Colonel Landram. I saw some of the Home Guards this morning from Madison, and directed them to move a portion of their force to ford of Big Rockcastle, and obstruct the road at once. I suppose the work will be commenced this afternoon.
If you design sending a force to Big Hill by way of Lancaster and Moore's, will it not be advisable to keep the road open north of the river Yesterday only about 150 of the rebels (according to report) were left in Barboursville; all the rest had fallen back to Cumberland Ford. Only some 2,000, according to best information I can get, came as far as Laurel Bridge; perhaps 150 cavalry entered London. Theirs seems to have been a mere marauding expedition. They gutted the houses at Barboursville before the infantry left on Monday. We are all safe here.
I hope to return to Camp Robinson to-morrow evening.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 S. P. CARTER,
 Lieutenant, U. S. Navy (on special duty).
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, October 2, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
Since General Carter arrived we have been over considerable country. The general thinks when the work is completed we will be secure against almost any force. With strangers they could not find passways, but «19 R R---VOL IV»  <ar4_290> persons acquainted with the country could get into our camp really ways. Still, they could not do so if we had a small force at each point. The distance from Little Rockcastle River to Big Rockcastle is some 3½ miles. A considerable portion of this distance is defended by natural cliffs, so that it relieves us from performing much labor at those places. Ten miles of the road south of our camp is almost a dense thicket on each side of the road, and could be defended, or at least we could annoy the enemy with infantry the entire distance, whilst we would be comparatively secure, provided we acted cautiously. General Carter can explain more explicitly.
Colonel Brown desires me to say to you that he can supply his command of twelve-months' men with beef and bread, but will be dependent on you or General Crittenden for sugar, coffee, soap, candles, and such other articles as are furnished. HE has no tents or camp equipage. Many of his men are bare of shoes, clothing, and blankets.
Colonel Brown desires to know whether or not he must open a correspondence with General Crittenden or must he address you on all matters connected with his military affairs? HE desires such instructions as you may from time to time think proper to give.
Colonel Brown has now enrolled and in camp some 250 twelve-months' soldiers. HE has muskets, but no cartridge-boxes, caps, pouches, nor bayonet scabbards. HE desires to hear from you as soon as convenient. Mount Vernon is the post-office, if sent by mail.

I have not heard anything of the rebels since they reached Barboursville. The last account is that some 100 or upwards were in Barboursville. I have heard, but do not say that it is reliable, that there is a robbing party going through Knox County, plundering every person (almost) they come across, and that it is headed by men by the name of Arthur, citizens of Knox County, Kentucky.
I have got Colonel Brown to move all of his men to the river except one company, and they are outside our camp in a rock house. We have been much annoyed by them, as well as visitors and others who were driven before the rebels. Some of them returned this evening part of the way home, but heard of the rebels below London, and they returned to camp. The report, I am satisfied, is false.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
-----
 OCTOBER 3, 1861.
I have not said anything about the cavalry, as I supposed they would return. It will be very inconvenient for our men to go so far from camp as they should to be effective. The road from our camp towards London for several miles is only tolerable, but from that point to the rebel camp on Cumberland River is as good if not better than and other dirt road in Kentucky that I know.
Respectfully,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
-----
:HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
October 2, 1861.
 :Brigadier-General THOMAS,
Commanding Camp Dick Robins:
SIR: I have the most urgent appeals from important points in my department for military protection. There are two strategic points of the <ar4_291> very first consequence which I desire to occupy in advance of the enemy. I trust, therefore, you will take prompt measures to inform yourself of the strength and position of the advancing forces, and advise me daily by special messenger and telegraph of your own strength, that I may be able to decide how the troops from Ohio and Indiana now getting ready for the field should be distributed.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
October 3, 1861.
 Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE,
Assistant Adjutant-General, U.S. Army:
CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report to the general commanding the arrival here of the Fourteenth and Thirty-first Ohio Regiments and the Thirty-third Indiana. There are three other regiments at Nicholasville which could have been here to-night if our means of transportation had been sufficient to bring them over. Only one of these regiments has any transportation, the Indiana, and the want of it has embarrassed me very much. Our supply as yet is very limited, and all the mules have to be broken, so that we are embarrassed in that respect also; but as soon as I can get up enough wagons I propose moving on beyond London and strengthening the position, so as to relieve as much of the country as possible from the depredations of the rebels. The report to-night is that they have again retired, after finding I had got possession of Rockcastle Hills. I shall move with caution, however, but endeavor to drive them out of the Cumberland passes before re-enforcements can reach them. I could move at once if these regiments had been supplied with transportation; but as it is impossible to hire enough in the country, I shall have to wait until I can have it sent to me. A battery of artillery completely equipped would give me a great advantage. Respectfully, your obedient servant, GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General,
 U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
CAMP WILDCAT, October 3, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
I have no information in regard to the rebels more than I wrote you, except the inclosed order of General Zollicoffer, which I have no doubt is genuine. I could not doubt it, because they carried out the instructions to the letter. I also inclose you a letter directed to Hon. Green Adams, &c.(*) The bearer of this letter, Mr. Hurst, is reliable, and was in Tennessee sometime since and taken prisoner. The order front Major Coffee, countermanding the blockade of the Madison Fork of the Rich-mend road, was sent me this evening. If we have one day's notice, which we certainly will have, I can have the road blocked up completely. However, we have been doing and undoing so much, that you may begin to think we are fickle. I should not have ordered the blockade the second time if it had not have been for General Carter, and he was for carrying out instructions.  <ar4_292>
You will see before this reaches you that Colonel Brown has moved to the river some 2 miles from us. I would be afraid to place them between the enemy and our camp. Some of his men are, I fear, a little timid, and I doubt whether or not they will do their duty on that side of us. There is a tolerable good camping ground about 2 miles beyond our camp. General Carter spoke of' it as we passed it, looking out the points to blockade. It is near Little Rockcastle, and near a point where the road passes between the point of a ridge and Little Rock-castle River. At the point where we are camped there is but little room, though we can stick our tents about on points and sides of hills, and could find room enough to place another regiment on the same kind of ground.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
P. S.---Are there any cartridges for rifled muskets at Camp Robinson? The muskets I received of Captain Cardwell, of Harrodsburg, are rifled. I have not examined, but learn from others the ordinary cartridge will not suit them. Surgeon Hogan has not yet been furnished with a tent. He desires one sent, if there is any to be had.
[Inclosure. ]
BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,
Camp Buckner, September 25, 1861.
Col. James E. Rains will march at 4 o'clock to-morrow morning, via Barboursville, to Laurel Bridge, on the London road, with his regiment, provisioned for six days, three rations of which should be cooked, leaving his tents in this encampment. Colonel McNairy's command will accompany him or follow him, by a right-hand road crossing Laurel Creek about 2 miles above the bridge. Colonel R. will have command, and will dislodge a supposed force of the enemy at the bridge by attacking simultaneously with infantry and cavalry at both ends of the bridge. He will be furnished a guide who will give him information of some arms, which he will capture, if practicable. He will take with him also Lieutenant Falcond's section of artillery. A battalion of Colonel Statham’s infantry, with three companies of Colonel Branner's cavalry, will be posted on the road to be pursued by Colonel McNairy about 10 miles back, to give support, if necessary. Simultaneously. Colonel Cummings' regiment, with two companies of Colonel Broydton's [Brazel-ton's?] cavalry, will escort a train of wagons to the Goose Creek Salt Works, 16 or 18 miles east, in Clay County, to load with salt. The different detachments will communicate by express messengers with each other and with me, and when the salt train returns all will return to this encampment. Much is trusted to Colonel Rains' discretion in whatever may transpire on the way.
 F. K. ZOLLICOFFER,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
October 3, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,  Commanding Camp Dick Robinson, Ky.:
GENERAL: I have just received yours of the 1st instant. The regiments sent from Ohio to your camp have been compelled to leave without <ar4_293> their wagons, owing to the fact that no time could be lost in getting them into the field. I have now the wagons, horses, and harness, and am organizing a force of teamsters, and hope very soon to supply all the regiments with transportation.
You request me to send the column of about four regiments up the Big Sandy, to co-operate with you in your advance upon the Cumberland Gap. You do not advise me what amount of force is indispensably necessary at Camp Dick Robinson before you will feel it expedient to commence your advance.
We have in Ohio at this time a limited number of arms. The number of regiments which we can put in the field is necessarily limited. Admitting we have but three regiments remaining prepared to move in all this week, do you prefer them to be sent to your camp, or do you prefer them to undertake the expedition up the Sandy?
Send your answer by a mounted messenger to the telegraph office, that it may promptly reach me.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
CAMP KENTON, MASON COUNTY,
Near Maysville, Ky., October 4, 1861.
 Captain GREENE,  Assistant Adjutant-General:
SIR: I desire to call the attention of General Anderson to the following intelligence that comes to me from a person in whom I have the highest confidence, and who is himself high in secession counsel, but is in truth a Union man, true and loyal. This person has never yet deceived me.
Breckinridge is not in Prestonburg or that vicinity, but is in Richmond, Va. He sent a messenger to W. R. H. Stanton, who arrived day before yesterday, saying that he (Breckinridge) would return in a very few days as general, and that the secession companies would hold themselves in readiness and be prepared to meet him at Hazel Green, in Mason County, on his return, of which event they would be early notified.
The message went on to say that the whole of Beauregard's army was on its way to Kentucky, and will winter in Kentucky, and will be here in time to take advantage of the hay crop; that there was but a thin line of troops in front of Washington masking the movement.
Now, see, this comes to me from such a source that I believe it. The sudden accessions to the strength of Zollicoffer, Buckner, and Polk show that such a movement, or one similar, is on foot. A virtual panic exists in this part of Kentucky; a fear of the General Government's ability to aid them.
I beg to call the general's attention to another point which is doing injury to the cause here. A number of persons are establishing camps in impossible and out-of-the-way places, and raising troops for regiments that can never be found, acting in competition with each other, all desirous of having a camp on his own or his immediate neighbor's farm, and all claiming to be acting under the authority of General Anderson, and pitch in without the slightest reference to me. The consequence is that there is no head here, no authority or control. If the general will confide to me the raising of troops in this section and give me authority over that which immediately surrounds me, it seems to me that I can <ar4_294> manage the affairs rather more successfully than it proceeds at present. I have at least some experience in raising an army. The utter confusion in which affairs are in this section impels me to call attention to it.
Very respectfully,
 W. NELSON,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
Garrard County, Kentucky, October 4, 1861.
 General ROBERT ANDERSON,
Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky. :
GENERAL: I have been informed to-day privately, and I do not know that it is true, that 25,000 men will be sent to Kentucky within ten days to meet any movements on the part of the rebels against Kentucky. Should it be so, I have to ask that four of the best regiments, with two batteries, may be sent to me, supplied with transportation and ammunition. I believe if I could get such a force here, and be ready to march in ten days from this time, that I could seize on the railroad at Knoxville and cut off all communication between Memphis and Virginia.
The information I receive at this time from Tennessee is, that there are now but few troops in East Tennessee, but that it is the intention of the rebels to concentrate a large force there to act against Kentucky, and that they intend to invade this State and winter here if they can. I told General Scott, when in Washington, that I believed they would attempt the occupation of Kentucky, but fear I failed to impress upon his mind that it would be an important move on their part, and that we ought to be on the lookout lest they get ahead again.
The regiments I am receiving are raw, and as little prepared for a daring enterprise as those I found at Camp Dick Robinson, besides which there is but one regiment among them supplied with means of transportation.
Zollicoffer has retired again, but I have a strong force in Rockcastle Hills, prepared to prevent any advance he may make. Two efficient batteries and four good regiments is all the additional force I want.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON,
October 4, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL,
Commanding Department of Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:
GENERAL: Affairs in this quarter are looking much better. The six regiments you have sent me are sufficient, unless the Southern force now in Virginia fall upon Kentucky. Should any movement of this kind be made I will give you timely notice of it.
My greatest want now is means of transportation.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
<ar4_295>
CAMP WILDCAT, October 5, 1861.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS:
About two hours after the messenger left this morning I learned the rebels were in London. In a short time I ordered Major Cardwell, with 200 soldiers, to take a position about 3 miles from camp, on a hill beyond Little Rockcastle, &c. I would have written you immediately, but I was not satisfied as to reliableness of the statement. A gentleman has just arrived, but he did not see a rebel; but there is no doubt but that some 9 cavalry were in London this morning, and they reported a force of 600 a short distance off. It may possibly be a plundering party.
I would not write you, but I think it better to keep you posted with their movements.
I would like very much to have some cavalry here. We have no doubt about sustaining our position.
I send this by Mr. Pitzer, of Barboursville. He will return to camp with any dispatch you may desire to send.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. T. GARRARD,
 Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.
-----
LOUISVILLE, KY., October 7, 1861.
 To ECKERT:
Returned from Muldraugh's Hill Saturday evening. W.T. Sherman says his force is only 4,000 raw troops. Kentuckians are not enlisting, and give no aid whatever. If he is expected to make any diversion or offensive movements he must have large re-enforcements. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad has but eighty cars all told, and not reliable for military transportation. All Federal troops recently arrived in Kentucky have been sent to General Thomas. The enemy's main force is in front of W. T. Sherman, but no indications of an intended advance.
 ANSON STAGER.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 7, 1861.
 General THOMAS:
DEAR SIR: Your communication of 4th instant is now before me. I have no information as to the movement of troops to Kentucky suggested by you. Should such, however, turn out to be the case, I will grant the request you make.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
Cincinnati, October 7, 1861.
 Brigadier-General THOMAS,
Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:
SIR: Your telegram of the 6th is received. At the earnest solicitation of Brigadier-General Nelson I have ordered the Second Ohio Regiment,  <ar4_296> Colonel Harris, to take position at a place called the Olympian Springs, about 20 miles east of Mount Sterling, in order to close the mountain gorge through which small bands of the enemy are constantly passing to Prestonburg to re-enforce a camp forming at that place. I have General Anderson's authority for sending this regiment to the point already named.
I look upon it as a strategic point of great importance in the contemplated advance towards Cumberland Gap.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 O. M. MITCHEL,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 7, 1861.
The commanding general learns with deep regret that arrests are being made in some parts of the State upon the slightest and most trivial grounds. He desires the civil authorities and orders the military not to make any arrests except where the parties are attempting to join the rebels or are engaged in giving aid or information to them, and in all cases the evidence must be such as will convict them before a court of justice. In some cases it is understood that the Home Guards have gone into adjoining counties and arrested and carried off parties who have been quietly remaining at home under the expectation that they would not be interfered with, provided that they did nothing in violation of the spirit of the proclamation bearing date of September 24, issued from these headquarters. Some instances are mentioned of persons having been arrested and taken out of the State.
This is all contrary to what the commanding general has declared to be his wish, and he trusts it will not be repeated.
It is believed that many of those who at one time sympathized with rebellion are desirous of returning to their allegiance and wish to remain quietly at home attending to their business. A conciliatory, fair course pursued towards such persons will join them to our cause; the reverse may force them into the ranks of our enemies.
The commanding general entreats and urges his fellow-citizens to discountenance and endeavor to put a stop to these ill-timed and unlawful arrests, and to aid him in keeping peace among ourselves.
By command of Brigadier-General Anderson:
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.
The following telegraph order was received yesterday at the headquarters:
WASHINGTON, D.C., October 6, 1861.
Brigadier-General ANDERSON:
To give you rest necessary to restoration of health, call Brigadier-General Sherman to command the Department of the Cumberland. Turn over to him your instructions, and report here in person as soon as you may without retarding your recovery.
WINFIELD SCOTT.
In obedience to the above orders, I hereby relinquish the command of the department to Brigadier-General Sherman. <ar4_297>
Regretting deeply the necessity which renders this step proper, I do it with less reluctance, because my successor, Brigadier-General Sherman, is the man I had selected for that purpose. God grant that he may be the means of delivering this department from the marauding bands, who, under the guise of relieving and benefiting Kentucky, are doing all the injury they can to those who will not join them in their accursed warfare.
 ROBERT ANDERSON,
 Brigadier-General U.S. Army, Commanding.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.
Brig. Gen. Robert Anderson having relinquished the command of this department in General Orders, No. 6, of this date, the undersigned assumes command of this department.
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.
 Brigadier-General CRITTENDEN:
SIR: I have made an order for you to go to Owensborough and to assume command of the regiments organizing in that quarter.
I am aware that whilst regiments are being formed and equipped they can do little service, yet our enemies give us little time, and we must do the best we can.
If one of the regiments could show itself on Green River, make a circuit south of the river and return, it would have a good effect. Hop-kinsville has 1,000 men, but poorly armed, and a demonstration on it would probably lead to its evacuation.
Kentucky looks for some bold stroke, and with such men as Jackson, Johnson, Burbridget Hawkins, and McHenry almost anything might be attempted.
You may purchase subsistence or hire wagons at discretion. Certify the bills and I will have them paid here.
Yours, &c.,
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
LOUISVILLE, KY., October 8, 1861.
 GARRETT DAVIS,  Esq., Paris, Ky.:
DEAR SIR: In reply to your letter of 7th instant(*) I state that General Anderson has already ordered an Ohio regiment to the point suggested by you in your favor. No further troops will be ordered now.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General.
P. S.---I am forced into the command of this department against my will, and it would take 300,000 men to fill half the calls for troops.
<ar4_298>
LOUISVILLE, KY., October 8, 1861.
 GARRETT DAVIS,  Esq.:
DEAR SIR: Yours of this date is received.(*) You will be surprised to learn that we have not the arms you mention. Arms are coming forward very slowly. I have written and telegraphed to General Nelson, at Maysville, to take a regiment from Portsmouth, Ohio, up the Big Sandy, and at the same time for the Ohio regiment at Olympian Springs to advance towards Prestonburg. If Colonel Davis can by any means at hand scatter that camp I will approve of all the steps, but an advance up the Sandy, now navigable, would be almost sure to result in the retreat or dispersion of the force. But we have not the arms. Men are, offering, but arms and equipments are wanting.
The real struggle in Kentucky is to be between this and Nashville.
Yours,
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General.
-----
LOUISVILLE, KY.,October 8, 1861.
 Colonel JACKSON,  Owensborough:
DEAR SIR: Yours of the 6th(*) is received. I am forced to organize and operate with insufficient means and materials. Your regiment has more facilities than any other, and I hope you will make rapid progress. Keep some runners down to Christian to keep up the hearts of your people, and if you could make a push of a few hundred men towards Hopkinsville it would disturb Buckner a good deal. I send General Crittenden down to Owensborough. They have not sent me a single regular officer from Washington, and so engrossed are they with Missouri, that they don't do us justice. The more necessity for us to strain every nerve.
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.
 Brigadier-General NELSON,
Commanding at Maysville, Ky.:
GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to say that if in your judgment you can by a sudden march or by chartering a steamboat to go up the Sandy surprise the rebel camp at Prestonburg, he fully authorizes you to do so, and desires you to do so.
He is aware of your being greatly deficient in arms and ammunition for an expedition, but he hopes you may be able to arm a sufficient number of men for the purpose with the arms of the country.
The general does not order this expedition, but hopes it can be undertaken. It is left entirely to your discretion.
I am, general, yours, &c.,
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
<ar4_299>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.
 General WARD,  Greensburg, Ky. :
I have been called here by General Anderson to assume command in Kentucky. Until regiments are organized and equipped it will be almost impossible to brigade them. Still, if you hear of Buckner's forces advancing from Bowling Green, you could show your force on his flank about Glasgow or Little Barren and cause him to hesitate.
Gather in all the Home Guard arms you can find. They are the property of the United States, confided to them for special reasons, but now that armies are in the field these scattered muskets are of little use.
We are moving heaven and earth to get the arms, clothing, and money necessary in Kentucky, but McClellan and Frémont have made such heavy drafts that the supply is scant.
Yours, &c.,
 W. T. SHERMAN,
 Brigadier-General, Commanding.
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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 38
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 9, 1861.
Brig. Gen. L. H. Rousseau will move his camp as soon as practicable forward to the vicinity of Nolin, selecting, with the advice of Captain Prime, a position for a large force.
He will cause scouts to be sent forward towards Green River, and take every advantage of position left unoccupied by the enemy.
By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 39
HDQRS. DEP'T OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Louisville, Ky., October 9, 1861.
Brig. Gen. T. L. Crittenden will proceed with as little delay as possible to Owensborough and Henderson, and take command of the United States forces at these two points. He will report in person to the general commanding, before his departure, for special orders and instructions.
By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:
 OLIVER D. GREENE,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.
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CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 10, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,
Commanding Dep't of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:
GENERAL: The falling back of the rebels under Zollicoffer indicates the necessity of an outward movement on our part to seize the Cumberland Gap and afford protection to our friends in East Tennessee, and with this in view the instructions (a copy of which is inclosed) to Brigadier-General Mitchel have been given. It is hoped your judgment accords with the views of the Secretary of War, and will cheerfully aid <ar4_300> in carrying them out. The Secretary of War will arrange a meeting with you in a few days.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 L. THOMAS,
 Adjutant-General.
[Inclosure.]
CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 10, 1861.
 Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL,
Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:
GENERAL: By direction of the Secretary of War you are hereby assigned to duty in the Department of the Cumberland, and will repair to Camp Dick Robinson, and there prepare the troops for an outward movement, the object being to take possession of Cumberland Ford and Cumberland Gap, and ultimately seize the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad and attack and drive the rebels from that region of country. You will report your instructions to Brigadier-General Sherman, in command of this department, and be governed by such further orders as he may give.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 L. THOMAS,
 Adjutant-General.

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