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Reports of the battle for Chattanooga 23-25 Nov. 63

1. George H. Thomas
2. Ulysses S. Grant
3. Joseph Hooker
4. William T. Sherman
5. Peter J. Osterhaus
6. August Willich
7. Henry W. Halleck
------------
8. Braxton Bragg
9. Patrick R. Cleburne
10. Alexander P. Stewart  ?



8. Braxton Bragg
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 219.--Report of General Braxton Bragg, C. S. Army, commanding Army of Tennessee, with field dispatches, etc.

[ar55_664 con't]
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Dalton, Ga., November 30, 1863.
SIR: On Monday, the 23d, the enemy advanced in heavy force and drove in our picket line in front of Missionary Ridge, but made no further effort.
On Tuesday morning early they threw over the river a heavy force opposite the north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of the Chickamauga, at the same time displaying a heavy force in our immediate front. After visiting the right and making dispositions there for the new development in that direction, I returned toward the left to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault, and was met by one brigade only (Walthall's) which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground. Why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field (Major-General Stevenson) had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his urgent appeal another brigade was dispatched in the afternoon to his support, though it appeared his own forces had not been brought into action and I proceeded to the scene. Arriving just before sunset, I found we had lost all the advantages of the position. Orders were immediately given for the ground to be disputed until we could withdraw our forces across Chattanooga Creek, and the movement was commenced. This having been successfully accomplished, our whole forces were concentrated on the ridge and extended to the right to meet the movement in that direction.
On Wednesday, the 25th, I again visited the extreme right, now under Lieutenant-General Hardee, and threatened by a heavy force, while strong columns could be seen marching in that direction. A very heavy force in line of battle confronted our left and center.
On my return to this point, about 11 a.m., the enemy's forces were being moved in heavy masses from Lookout and beyond to our front, while those in front extended to our right. They formed their lines with great deliberation just beyond the range of our guns and in plain view of our position. Though greatly outnumbered, such was the strength of our position that no doubt was entertained of <ar55_665> our ability to hold it, and every disposition was made for that purpose. During this time they had made several attempts on our extreme right, and had been handsomely repulsed with very heavy loss by Major-General Cleburne's command, under the immediate direction of Lieutenant-General Hardee. By the road across the ridge at Rossville, far to our left, a route was open to our rear. Major-General Breckinridge, commanding on the left, had occupied this with two regiments and a battery. It being reported to me that a force of the enemy had moved in that direction, the general was ordered to have it reconnoitered, and to make every disposition necessary to secure his flank, which he proceeded to do.
About 3.30 p.m. the immense force in the front of our left and center advanced in three lines, preceded by heavy skirmishers. Our batteries opened with fine effect, and much confusion was produced before they reached musket range.
In a short time the roar of musketry became very heavy, and it was soon apparent that the enemy had been repulsed in my immediate front. While riding along the crest congratulating the troops, intelligence reached me that our line was broken on my right and the enemy had crowned the ridge. Assistance was promptly dispatched to that point, under Brigadier-General Bate, who had so successfully maintained the ground in my front, and I proceeded to the rear of the broken line to rally our retiring troops and return them to the crest to drive the enemy back. General Bate found the disaster so great that his small force could not repair it.
About this time I learned that our extreme left had also given way, and that my position was almost surrounded. Bate was immediately directed to form a second line in the rear, where, by the efforts of my staff, a nucleus of stragglers had been formed upon which to rally. Lieutenant-General Hardee, leaving Major-General Cleburne in command on the extreme right, moved toward the left when he heard the heavy firing in that direction. He reached the right of Anderson's division just in time to find it had nearly all fallen back, commencing on its left, where the enemy had first crowned the ridge. By a prompt and judicious movement he threw a portion of Cheatham's division directly across the ridge facing the enemy, who was now moving a strong force immediately on his left flank. By a decided stand here the enemy was entirely checked, and that portion of our force to the right remained intact.
All to the left, however, except a portion of Bate's division, was entirely routed and in rapid flight, nearly all the artillery having been shamefully abandoned by its infantry support. Every effort which could be made by myself and staff and by many other mounted officers availed but little. A panic which I had never before witnessed seemed to have seized upon officers and men, and each seemed to be struggling for his personal safety, regardless of his duty or his character. In this distressing and alarming state of affairs, General Bate was ordered to hold his position, covering the road for the retreat of Breckinridge's command, and orders were immediately sent to Generals Hardee and Breckinridge to retire their forces upon the depot at Chickamauga.
Fortunately, it was now near nightfall, and the country and roads in our rear were fully known to us, but equally unknown to the enemy. The routed left made its way back in great disorder, effectually covered, however, by Bate's small command, which had a sharp conflict with the enemy's advance, driving it back. After <ar55_666> night, all being quiet, Bate retired in good order, the enemy attempting no pursuit.
Lieutenant-General Hardee's command, under his judicious management, retired in good order and unmolested.
As soon as all troops had crossed, the bridges over the Chickamauga were destroyed to impede the enemy, though the stream was fordable at several places.
No satisfactory excuse can possibly be given for the shameful conduct of our troops on the left in allowing their line to be penetrated. The position was one which ought to have been held by a line of skirmishers against any assaulting column, and wherever resistance was made the enemy fled in disorder after suffering heavy loss. Those who reached the ridge did so in a condition of exhaustion from the great physical exertion in climbing, which rendered them powerless, and the slightest effort would have destroyed them. Having secured much of our artillery, they soon availed themselves of our panic, and, turning our guns upon us, enfiladed the lines, both right and left, rendering them entirely untenable.
Had all parts of the line been maintained with equal gallantry and persistence no enemy could ever have dislodged us, and but one possible reason presents itself to my mind in explanation of this bad conduct in veteran troops who had never before failed in any duty assigned them, however difficult and hazardous. They had for two days confronted the enemy, marshaling his immense forces in plain view, and exhibiting to their sight such a superiority in numbers as may have intimidated weak-minded and untried soldiers; but our veterans had so often encountered similar hosts when the strength of position was against us, and with perfect success, that not a doubt crossed my mind. As yet I am not fully informed as to the commands which first fled and brought this great disaster and disgrace upon our arms. Investigation will bring out the truth, however, and full justice shall be done to the good and the bad.
After arriving at Chickamauga and informing myself of the full condition of affairs, it was decided to put the army in motion for a point farther removed from a powerful and victorious army, that we might have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance.
Lieutenant-General Hardee, as usual, is entitled to my warmest thanks and high commendation for his gallant and judicious conduct during the whole of the trying scenes through which we passed.
Major-General Cleburne, whose command defeated the enemy in every assault on the 25th, and who eventually charged and routed him on that day, capturing several stand of colors and several hundred prisoners, and who afterward brought up our rear with great success, again charging and routing the pursuing column at Ringgold on the 27th, is commended to the special notice of the Government.
Brigadier-Generals Gist and Bate, commanding divisions; Cumming, Walthall, and Polk, commanding brigades, were distinguished for coolness, gallantry, and successful conduct throughout the engagements and in the rear guard on the retreat.
To my staff, personal and general, my thanks are specially due for <ar55_667> their gallant and zealous efforts under fire to rally the broken troops and restore order, and for their laborious services in conducting successfully the many and arduous duties of the retreat.
Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to have been very small. In prisoners and stragglers I fear it is much larger. The chief of artillery reports the loss of forty pieces.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 BRAXTON BRAGG, General, Commanding.
 General S. COOPER, Adjt. and Insp. Gen., C. S. Army, Richmond.
ADDENDA.
MISSIONARY RIDGE,
November 20, 1863.
 JEFFERSON DAVIS,
President:
Sherman's force has arrived, and a movement on our left is indicated. The same game may have to be played over. Have advised General Johnston; he seems to be fettered by the orders you gave in Mississippi, restricting him to sending only two brigades with Hardee. As Banks is in Texas, and other forces from our front there are in Arkansas and Louisiana, we need but little in that direction.
Mobile could certainly spare some. Our fate may be decided here, and the enemy is at least double our strength.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
HEADQUARTERS,
November 20, 1863---4.30 a.m.
 General STEVENSON:
GENERAL: Your dispatch of 2 a.m. just received. Retain Jackson's brigade for the present. Direct the cavalry to guard well the road leading from Johnson's Crook. As I don't know the localities, you may do as you judge best respecting the withdrawal of the force from Nickajack and points beyond. Block the main road, commencing at the point where the road from Johnson's Crook intersects it. I will be with you early to-day, but don't wait for me; go in front.
Very respectfully,
 W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-General.
-----
HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chattanooga Valley, November 20, 1863--9.45 p.m.
 Major-General STEVENSON,
Commanding Lookout Mountain:
GENERAL: One brigade will be sufficient to hold at the point at which we left General Brown. Withdraw the other brigade and push forward your defenses with vigor, by day and by night. I have ordered General Pettus' brigade to be sent you early to-mor-row, and one battery of artillery. Keep one section of artillery constantly with your advanced brigade. General Bragg has ordered 100 <ar55_668> cavalry to report to you early to-morrow morning, and this additional force of cavalry ought to keep you well advised of the movements of the enemy in your front. General Leadbetter has ordered 50 for you, and if they have not arrived please advise me. Direct your advanced brigade to make obstinate defense, so as to give time to send you re-enforcements. Be constantly on the alert. General Bragg is under the conviction that a serious movement is being made on our left. Keep me thoroughly advised of all that passes.
With high respect, your obedient servant,
 W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-General.
Johnson moves in the morning for Stevens' Gap to strike on flank.
-----
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 10.
HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENN.,
Chattanooga Valley, November 20, 1863.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
IV. Brigadier-General Pettus will proceed with his brigade to-morrow morning at daylight to the top of Lookout Mountain and report to Major-General Stevenson.
By command of Lieutenant-General Hardee:
 T. B. ROY, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
Chattanooga Valley, November 21, 1863.
 Col. GEORGE WILLIAM BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
COLONEL: Your order to suspend the movement of Brigadier-General Johnson till further orders has been received. I have instructed him on his return to encamp in this vicinity, thinking it General Bragg's wish in ordering his division to report to me to strengthen this part of the line. If on the contrary it is his wish that he should return to his old encampment, please inform me at once.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-General.
-----
HDQRS. HARDEE'S COPRS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chattanooga Valley, November 21, 1863.
 Major-General STEVENSON, Commanding Lookout Mountain:
GENERAL: General Hardee directs me to forward to you the following extract from a communication just received by him from General Bragg:
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 21, 1863.
GENERAL: (* * *) The general deems it best that you should have all the avenues of approach to Lookout Mountain as far down as the crook protected by rifle-pits and other defenses against the approaches of the enemy.
GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
 <ar55_669>
And to say that he desires you to carry out the wishes of General Bragg, and to have the approaches indicated above protected by rifle-pits and other defenses.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 D. H. POOLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
LOOKOUT,
November 21, 1863--10 a.m.
 General HARDEE:
The enemy that were moving from Trenton toward Chattanooga are encamped to-night near Hawkins'. Scouts sent this afternoon to every point on this line. Will give full information to-morrow morning.
 C. L. STEVENSON.
/-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 21, 1863.
 Lieutenant-General HARDEE,
Commanding Corps:
GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to say that you can suspend any farther movement of Brigadier-General Johnson's command. The cavalry brigade ordered to the cove has been directed to retake Johnson's Crook and hold it against the enemy at all hazards. The general deems it best that you should have all the avenues of approach to Lookout Mountain as far down as the crook protected by rifle-pits and other defenses against the approach of the enemy.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General,
(For information of Major-General Stevenson, commanding Lookout Mountain.)
HEADQUARTERS,
Powell's Trail, November 21, [1863]--2.45 p.m.
 Maj. J. J. REEVE,
Asst. Adjt. Gen., Stevenson's Division:
MAJOR: I have just returned from the signal station, from which I saw a brigade of five regiments, one battery, and a train of 30 wagons passing from the direction of Trenton toward Wauhatchie Station. It is probable that it is the force (or a part of it) which was on the mountain at Johnson's Crook. I have sent to Major McConnell to send out another scout to ascertain, if possible. I have sent a man to Trenton.
I am, major, most respectfully,
 J. C. BROWN, Brigadier-General.
P. S.--Neither artillery nor cavalry have reported. If you will send a guard to the signal station nearest you on the western brow of the mountain, I can communicate with your headquarters at night, if necessary.
 <ar55_670>
HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chattanooga Valley, November 22, 1863.
 Major-General STEVENSON,
Commanding on Lookout Mountain:
GENERAL: General Hardee directs me to say that you will have a reconnais-sance made toward Trenton and Lookout Valley, to ascertain whether there is any enemy at Trenton, or in that direction. The reconnaissance will be made as far down the valley as possible without endangering the command. He also desires me to inform you that he has ordered a reconnaissance from Johnson's Crook in that direction.
Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,
 D. H. POOLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chattanooga Valley, November 22, 1863.
 Brigadier-General DAVIDSON,
Commanding Cavalry:
GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee directs that, in obedience to inclosed order of this date, from headquarters Army of Tennessee, you will make a strong cavalry reconnaissance in Lookout Valley, to observe the enemy and ascertain his strength and movements. You will report the result to these headquarters at the earliest practicable moment.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. B. ROY, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS,
Powell's Trail, November 22, 1863--11.30 a.m.
 Maj. J. J. REEVE,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Stevenson's Division:
MAJOR: I have heard nothing from the front since the dispatch of Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson last night, which was forwarded through your headquarters to the lieutenant-general commanding. I am satisfied there is no enemy on the mountain, yet it would be prudent, perhaps (as discretion is left me), to await the return of Colonel Butler, who was sent out last night. He has not yet reported. If you think it better for me to return at once, please dispatch me by signal. I will await that order, unless in the meantime Colonel Butler reports.
I am, major, most respectfully, your obedient servant,
 J. C. BROWN, Brigadier-General.
-----
LOOKOUT, November 22, [1863]--4 p.m.
 General HARDEE:
Not less than six--I think more--with artillery and several miles of wagon trains, have passed to-day toward Chattanooga. The head of column is now halted opposite the bridge.
 C. L. STEVENSON.
 <ar55_671>
LOOKOUT, [November] 22, 1863.
 General HARDEE:
Will Colonel Anderson remain at Johnson's Crook? If so, can he picket to include Silton's trail, next above McCaig's? Will he report direct to you? I will use the cavalry on the mountain to picket Trenton and the trails from McCaig's, to include Nickajack.
 C. L. STEVENSON.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
[November 22, 1863]--3.30 p.m.
 Major-General STEVENSON:
Gist's division, as I ordered, has moved to the right. Send a brigade as soon as possible to occupy his front. Jackson has been ordered to send another.
 W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-General.
Send Cumming at once. Let him move quickly; say the enemy are advancing.
-----
LOOKOUT, November 22, [1863.]
 General HARDEE:
It is important that the signal line to our outposts, if not to Trenton, be kept up. They were removed on yesterday without my knowledge. Please assign a signal officer to duty here to report to me.
 C. L. STEVENSON.
-----
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN,
November 22, [1863.]
 Major WADDELL,
Commanding:
Join me without delay. If the battery is ready for the field, bring it; if not, come in person.
 C. L. STEVENSON, Major-General.
-----
1 p.m.
 Maj. RICHARD ORME:
Re-enforce General Moore at the Craven house.
 C. L. STEVENSON.
-----
[NOVEMBER 22, 1863.]
 General STEVENSON:
Ascertain if there are any enemy in Lookout Valley. Cause your cavalry to make a reconnaissance with that view.
 W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-General, Commanding Corps.
 <ar55_672>
LOOKOUT, November 22, [1863.]
 General HARDEE:
No report from scout sent to Trenton. Cavalry ordered there last night. The enemy burned some houses in the night, and I think left at same time: Will report as soon as I ascertain definitely. Signal line has been removed from west side and communication is by courier only.  It should be re-established.
 C. L. STEVENSON, Major-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
November 22, 1863.
 General STEVENSON,
Lookout Mountain:
I will attend to it.
 W. J. HARDEE.
-----
 NOVEMBER 22, 1863.
 Major REEVE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
MAJOR: I have been unable to ascertain certainly whether there is any enemy at Trenton. I believe there is none. I have 2 scouts out now for that purpose. They will report to Colonel Butler on their return to Powell's Pass. Two other scouts were sent in that direction last night, who have not returned. I directed Colonel Butler to use the scouts on their return until further orders.
Respectfully, major, your obedient servant,
 J. C. BROWN, Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS,
Powell's Pass, November 22, 1863--2. 15 p.m.
 Maj. J. J. REEVE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
MAJOR: Colonel Butler has returned and reports no enemy on the mountain. Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson occupies Johnson's Crook and had sent a scout toward Trenton.
I have ordered Major McConnell to take up his old position at Trenton and withdraw his picket from the Johnson Crook road. Not hearing again from you, I have ordered Captain Kuhn to move to position occupied by McConnell's picket on this road (10 miles distant), report to you from time to time, and to establish two courier stations for that purpose. He has neither rations nor forage. My brigade is in motion to its old camp, leaving Butler on picket, as before. I have ordered Colonel Butler to construct defenses at each pass of logs, &c.
I am, major, yours, &c.,
 J. C. BROWN, Brigadier-General.
 <ar55_673>
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 26.
HDQRS. BRECKINRIDGE'S CORPS,
Missionary Ridge, November 22, 1863.
Brigadier-General Bate will move his division immediately after sunset this evening and rest his right at or near Moore's house on our present line of intrenchments. Major-General Stewart will, at the same hour, deploy his reserve troops, and place them in continuation of his present line so as to fill, as nearly as possible, the gap between his right and Brigadier-General Bate's left.
Should the two divisions not, by these dispositions, cover the whole line from Moore's house to Chattanooga Creek, Generals Stewart and Bate will place such troops in the interval between their commands as in their judgment they may think necessary to give the line sufficient strength. Details will be made from the above-named divisions to keep up, during the fore part of the night, fires along the line vacated this evening by the troops of Major-General Cleburne.
By order of Major-General Breckinridge:
 JAS. WILSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
MISSION RIDGE,
November 23, 1863.
 General S. COOPER,
Adjutant and Inspector General:
The enemy advanced in heavy force at 2 p.m. and drove in our pickets. He is still in line of battle in our front, but does not advance and all firing has ceased.
 BRAXTON BRAGG, General.
-----
CIRCULAR.]                           HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENN.,
Chattanooga Valley, November 23, 1863.
Division commanders will have their commands provided with three days' cooked rations.
By command of Lieutenant-General Hardee:
 T. B. ROY, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HDQRS. HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chattanooga Valley, November 23, 1863--4.20 p.m.
Major-General STEVENSON,
Commanding on Lookout Mountain:
GENERAL: General Hardee directs that you hold your command in readiness to move at a moment's notice.
Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,
 D. H. POOLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
 «43 R R--VOL XXXI, PT II» <ar55_674>
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 23, 1863.
 Lieutenant-General HARDEE:
GENERAL: Press forward to the right with your nearest division.
Respectfully,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 23, 1863.
 Lieutenant-General HARDEE:
GENERAL: The general commanding directs that you move the division already ordered by the right flank, and that you accompany it to take command on the right. Direct the balance of your command to hold itself in readiness to move at a moment's notice.
The general thinks from present information a brigade is all that is necessary on the top of the mountain.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
November 23, [1863]--4.45 [p.m.]
 Maj. Gen. C. L. STEVENSON,
Commanding Forces, Lookout:
Lieutenant-General Hardee has been ordered to the extreme right. You will assume command of the left. General Hardee thinks you had better establish your headquarters at Craven's house; at all events, advise him where you may be found.
By order of Lieutenant-General Hardee:
 T. B. ROY, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
FROM THE POINT,
November 23, 1863--5 p.m.
 HARDEE and BRAGG:
I observed closely the movements of the enemy until dark. An object seemed to be to attract our attention. All of the troops in sight were formed from center to left. Those on their right moved to center. The troops from Raccoon were in line in full sight. If they intend to attack, my opinion is it will be upon our left. Both of their bridges are gone.(*)
 C. L. STEVENSON.
[Indorsement.]
No demonstration anywhere upon line so far as heard. Signal corps thinks they have advanced nearly to road leading down from Simonton [Summertown?]. They have opened from their batteries <ar55_675> upon our left center. Mist and fog so dense cannot see anything at all. Captain Corput has been firing at house, but guns are not sufficiently depressed; are making arrangements to depress them more. Have sent off about 50 (?) men down trail toward Craven house to open a brisk fire upon the enemy's flank; are throwing rocks down.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
November 23, [1863.]
 Major-General STEVENSON:
GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee wishes, as soon as the two brigades have occupied General Gist's lines, that you have his pickets relieved, and the regiment left there ordered to join General Gist's division on the right immediately. Order, also, the battery left behind to join its brigade.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 D. G. WHITE, Major, &c.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
November 23, 1863--8.45 p.m.
 Major-General STEVENSON:
GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee directs that you relieve Garrity's battery at Lookout Point, and order it to report to Brigadier-General Anderson. He wishes you to place two Napoleon guns at that point. He further directs me to say that if the enemy should attempt to come up to the Craven house that you mass the larger portion of your force there.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 D. G. WHITE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863.
 Brigadier-General JACKSON:
General Hardee has been ordered to the right. I assume command of the troops west of Chattanooga Creek.
 C. L. STEVENSON, Major-General.
-----
LOOKOUT, November 23, [1863.]
 General HARDEE:
One half of Sherman's troops passed into the city last night. The remainder encamped on other side of river. We occupy Trenton. No enemy in that vicinity.
 C. L. STEVENSON, Major-General.
Prisoners and citizens report that Ewing's division was at Trenton. The other three divisions of Sherman's corps passed on to Chattanooga.
 <ar55_676>
HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S CORPS,
November 23, 1863--9 p.m.
 Major-General STEWART:
GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to desire you to rest the right of your [division] on the position of Slocomb's battery, and to organize any excess of men which this new disposition may give you into a reserve, subject to move in any direction required, at short notice. Your men need not actually occupy the trenches until an alarm. You will dispose your artillery along your line as you may deem best.
Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,
 JAS. WILSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ADAMS' BRIGADE,
November 23, 1863.
 Maj. R. A. HATCHER,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
I have the honor to ask to be permitted to move the troops from the intrenchments into their camps. Two regiments are encamped near the line, and the enemy has so far only appeared upon our front, the front of our pickets. Nearly half the command goes out on picket duty to-morrow unless some other disposition is made, and it would be well at least that these men should have rest to-night under shelter.
The weather threatens to become inclement, and the men will be exposed.
Yours, very respectfully,
 RANDALL LEE GIBSON, Colonel, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ADAMS' BRIGADE,
November 23, 1863.
 Maj. R. A. HATCHER,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
MAJOR: I have the honor to report to the major-general commanding, that the troops of his brigade will not more than cover the line of the intrenchments from the artillery to the creek upon our left; even then, they are not all formed in two ranks.
It will take nearly half of the command to furnish the detail for picket in the morning. This will render the force on the left of the artillery, guarding the left flank of the division, very small; and posted, in consequence of the want of any spades or picks whatever, behind very inferior works.
I deem it my duty to present these facts for the consideration of my superior officer.
I am, major, your obedient servant,
 RANDALL LEE GIBSON, Colonel, Commanding.
 <ar55_677>
MISSION RIDGE, November 24, 1863.
 General S. COOPER:
We have had a prolonged struggle for Lookout Mountain to-day and sustained considerable loss in one division. Elsewhere the enemy has only maneuvered for position. Nothing from the northeast. Telegraph not working. Jones should press on.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,
November 24, [1863]--6 a.m.
 Major-General STEVENSON,
Commanding, &c. :
GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee directs that you relieve Garrity's battery on Lookout Point, and direct it to report to Brigadier-General Anderson on the right of the line. Place two Napoleon guns at this point. Lieutenant-General Hardee desires me to say that this order was sent last night at 8.45 p.m.; no acknowledgment of its receipt has yet arrived here.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
 D. G. WHITE, Major, &c.
-----
HEADQUARTERS MOORE'S BRIGADE,
November 24, 1863.
 [Maj. J. J. REEVE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:]
MAJOR: The enemy have formed line and commenced skirmishing with our pickets near the railroad-bridge crossing of Lookout Creek. Cannot yet tell their object. When shall I place my brigade in line? Walthall is now on the left with his brigade.
Respectfully,
 JNO. C. MOORE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.
[Indorsement.]
The above is a copy of dispatch received from General Moore at 10.05 a.m.
 JOHN K. JACKSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CHEATHAM'S DIVISION,
November 24, 1863--11.30 a.m.
 Maj. J. J. REEVE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
MAJOR: General Moore, whose brigade is one of the two now at the Craven house, informs me that he has only 30 rounds of ammunition, and that his arms are very inferior. In case the attack should be made on that point, I respectfully suggest that a brigade be sent to re-enforce.
I should think that any movements of the enemy could be discovered from Lookout Point very easily.
I am, major, &c.,
 JOHN K. JACKSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.
 <ar55_678>
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 24, 1863.
 Major-General STEVENSON,
Lookout:
GENERAL: If there is no indication of a strong demonstration upon you, the general desires that you will remove one brigade from the mountain and put it on your line. Also send down your heavy batteries. Let this be done in such a manner as not to attract the notice of the enemy. Hold your command in readiness to move in any direction.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 24, 1863.
 Lieutenant-General HARDEE:
GENERAL: The enemy is moving a large force up the river toward your right in the direction of the place where he is reported crossing the Tennessee. The general commanding has directed General Cleburne and his division to move to the right in that direction.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
November 24, [1863]--,-2.30 p.m.
 Maj. Gen. C. L. STEVENSON,
Lookout Mountain:
GENERAL: The general commanding instructs me to say that you will withdraw your command from the mountain to this side of Chattanooga Creek, destroying the bridges behind. Fight the enemy as you retire. The thickness of the fog will enable you to retire, it is hoped, without much difficulty.
I am, general, very respectfully, yours,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
 NOVEMBER 25, 1863.
 General WRIGHT:
Cleburne's artillery is now on this side of the bridge. I think your position very unsafe.
As a friend I would advise you to fall back and try and guard the bridges across Chickamauga, and our depot of supplies. I fear we have been unsuccessful.
 L. E. POLK, Brigadier-General.
 <ar55_679>
CHICKAMAUGA, November 25, 1863--7 p.m.
 General S. COOPER:
After several unsuccessful assaults on our lines to-day, the enemy carried the left center about 4 o'clock. The whole left soon gave way in considerable disorder. The right maintained its ground, repelling every attack. I am withdrawing all to this point.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
CIRCULAR. ]                     HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chickamauga, Tenn., November 25, 1863.
I. Corps commanders will immediately put their commands in motion toward Ringgold, keeping their trains in front. They will move in two columns.
II. Hardee's corps will move by the west or Graysville road. Breckinridge's corps will move by the eastern or ---- road.
III. All quartermaster's, commissary, and ordnance stores will be sent to Dalton.
IV. Col. J. W. Grigsby will divide his cavalry and protect the rear of the two columns.
V. Corps commanders will call in their detachments and guards when they are ready to move.
Cleburne will serve as a rear guard to Hardee, and Gist to Breckinridge.
VI. Three days' rations of hard bread and salt meat will be carried.
By command of General Bragg:
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
CIRCULAR.]                        HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Chickamauga, November 25, 1863.
The troops will march at 2 a.m. to-morrow morning. By command of General Bragg:
 GEORGE WM. BRENT,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S CORPS,
November 25, 1863--1 a.m.
 Major-General STEWART:
GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you abandon the valley at once, and take position on the ridge, in prolongation of General Bate's line. He directs that you place a battery and two regiments at Rossville to guard that point. Your artillery will take position in rear of your division, passing through the dip in the ridge near Rossville. He directs that you withdraw your pickets a little before daylight, and throw them in prolongation of General Bate's, with a reserve at the foot of the ridge.
Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,
 JAS. WILSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.
 <ar55_680>
CIRCULAR.]                     HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S CORPS,
Watkins' House, November 25, 1863--12 p.m.
The following will be the order of march in the movement ordered to-night: Brigadier-General Bate's division will move in front and Stewart's division immediately in rear.
By command of Major-General Breckinridge:
 CHARLES J. MASTIN, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863.
 Major-General CHEATHAM,
Commanding on the Left:
GENERAL: The general commanding desires you to move at once, with your division and that of General Stevenson, to the right, and report to Lieutenant-General Hardee. Let this be done at once. The artillery will move, by way of Rossville, in rear of Missionary Ridge. The general hopes this movement will be made promptly.
I am, general, your obedient servant,
 KINLOCH FALCONER.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,
Near Ringgold, November 26, 1863--11.30 a.m.
 Lieutenant-General LONGSTREET,
Commanding near Knoxville:
GENERAL: On arriving here yesterday, about 1 p.m., I found that our line had been broken and our army was falling back. General Bragg desires me to say to you that he wishes you to fall back, with your command, upon Dalton, if possible. If you find that impracticable, he thinks you will have to fall back toward Virginia. At all events, he desires that you order all the cavalry to Dalton.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOS. WHEELER, Major-General.
-----
CIRCULAR.]                          HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Catoosa Station, November 26, 1863.
I. Generals Hardee and Breckinridge will march at daylight in the morning for Dalton. Major-General Cleburne's division will remain near Ringgold, unless forced back by the enemy.
II. Major-General Wheeler will assume command of Wharton's and Kelly's cavalry, and post it so as to cover and protect our front.
III. The Chief of Subsistence will place five days' rations for the army at Catoosa Station and Dalton, each.
By command of General Bragg:
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
 <ar55_681>
RINGGOLD, VIA DALTON,
November 27, 1863.
 General S. COOPER,
Adjutant and Inspector General:
We could make no stand at Chickamauga against the enemy's superior forces, and fell back yesterday. Our rear guard was heavily pressed about half way. Hope to make this our front.
 BRAXTON BRAGG, General.
-----
DALTON, November 27, 1863.
(Received at Meridian, 30th.)
 General JOHNSTON:
The enemy pressed our rear guard yesterday nearly to Ringgold. Brigadier-General Maney was severely wounded. The main portion of the army has reached this point. At last advices our rear was warmly engaged at Ringgold, which we are endeavoring to hold. Our loss in artillery on 25th was very heavy, probably forty pieces; in men, very small. The disastrous panic is inexplicable.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
NEAR DALTON,
November 27, 1863.
 Major-General WHEELER:
GENERAL: Your dispatch of 10 a.m. received. The general has established a position about 3 miles in front of Dalton, on which the rear guard can fall back should it become necessary. He has placed there the division of General Stewart, and about 1 ½ miles in rear of Stewart, Bate's division. The general desires that you will keep him fully and often advised of the movements in the rear. General Wharton is moving up with some cavalry to help you.
Respectfully,
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Dalton, Ga., November 27, 1863.
 Major-General WHEELER,
Commanding Cavalry Corps:
GENERAL: Your dispatch, dated 11.15 a.m., has been received. No change has been made in the dispositions of the general commanding. His movements depend upon those of the commands in front. General Bragg has selected a position 3 miles in front of Dalton, where General Stewart's division has been placed, General Bate about 1 ½ miles in his rear. Upon these you can fall back, if hard pressed. General Wharton has gone to the front with some cavalry.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 KINLOCH FALCONER, Assistant Adjutant-General.
 <ar55_682>
CIRCULAR.]                       HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Dalton, Ga., November 27, 1863.
I. Corps commanders will hold their troops in readiness to move in any direction at a moment's notice, and have them well in hand for an engagement.
II. So many errors having occurred in the transmission of dispatches, it is ordered that, during the march, at the end of a day's journey, all commanding officers will inform the officer next in rank the exact locality of their headquarters.
By command of General Bragg:
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
CIRCULAR.]                       HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,
Dalton, Ga., November 27, 1863.
All the trains of this army, excepting the ordnance and ammunition trains, will be immediately put in motion for Resaca, Ga., and march all night. The trains of the corps will be divided. One part of the train of each corps will go by the main road to Resaca, the remainder by the Sugar Valley road.
The ordnance and ammunition trains will go with the troops.
By command of General Bragg:
 GEORGE WM. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
DALTON, November 29, 1863,
(Received Richmond, 30th.)
 General S. COOPER:
Our advance last night was at Tunnel Hill, the enemy just this side of Ringgold. We hope to maintain this position. Our inferiority in numbers, heavy loss in artillery, small-arms, organization, and morale, renders an earlier halt impossible; and should the enemy press on promptly we may have to cross Oostenaula. I have tried to communicate with Longstreet; by prompt movement he can be saved. Burnside's force is far inferior to him. If necessary, he can go on and join Jones' forces. Communication may be opened with him by the East Tennessee route. My first estimate of our disaster was not too large, and time only can restore order and morale. All possible aid should be pushed on to Resaca, and I deem it due to the cause and to myself to ask for relief from command and all investigation into the causes of the defeat.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
RICHMOND, November 30, 1863.
 General BRAXTON BRAGG,
Dalton, Ga.:
GENERAL: Your dispatches of yesterday received. Your request to be relieved has been submitted to the President, who, upon your representation, directs me to notify you that you are relieved from command, which you will transfer to Lieutenant-General Hardee, the officer next in rank and now present for duty.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.
 <ar55_683>
DALTON, December 2, 1863.
(Received at Meridian, 3d.)
 General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON:
The enemy pursued us to Ringgold, where we punished him very severely. He then retreated, destroying all behind him, and will not press us again immediately. We are in good condition, with plenty artillery. I am superseded in command at my own request by Hardee. The future is pregnant with great events, but I believe our destiny is safe with prompt and united action.
 BRAXTON BRAGG.
-----
CALHOUN, GA., December 3, 1863.
 Col. J. GORGAS,
Chief of Ordnance, C. S. A., Richmond, Va.:
COLONEL: I have the honor to report that in the battle of the 24th and 25th ultimo, thirty-eight pieces of field artillery were taken by the enemy from this army, and two 24-pounder, siege, iron, rifled guns, after being disabled and carriages burned, were abandoned. The ordnance and ordnance stores in Chickamauga Depot are saved and are now at Calhoun, Ga. I am instructed, as soon as the army be refitted, to send all supplies to Atlanta Arsenal.
 H. OLADOWSKI, Lieutenant-Colonel.
-----
HEADQUARTERS CHEATHAM'S DIVISION,
January 9, 1864.
 Major-General STEVENSON:
GENERAL: I have just received your note of this date, inquiring about a communication received by me from General Moore on the 24th November last, and forwarded to you "to the effect that the enemy were massing a force on the Chattanooga road, apparently with an intention of moving on us from that direction."
I inclose to you a copy(*) of the only note I have from General Moore. It was received in the morning, and is not the one to which you refer.
The information you refer to came to me, not only from General Moore, but from officers of pickets, who escaped by the Kelley's Ferry road across the foot of the mountain. I recollect the information, but cannot give you the contents of the note. It was in consequence of this information (finding that we were so seriously threatened) that I first went up to confer with you.
Yours, truly,
 JOHN K. JACKSON.


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